Title of paper

Education Systems that Forgot the Unforgettable Values: The Case of Ethiopian Education System from 1941 to 1991

Presenter's country

Ethiopia

Start Date

27-5-2016 4:00 PM

End Date

27-5-2016 5:05 PM

Location

Hall I

Submission type

Presentation

Abstract

The guiding philosophy of an education system is derived from state ideology, which in most cases is based on indigenous legend and values. In this paper an attempt is made to show how a deliberate delink of education system from indigenous legend and values affect the success of education system. The education system of the two successive regimes of Ethiopia is taken as a case in point. To that end, the education systems and guiding principles of the two successive regimes that ruled over Ethiopia from 1941 to 1991is examined. Authors argue that each of the two regimes working in their own unique ideologies deliberately dissociated education system to use education as instrument to strengthen their dictatorial rule. It concludes that an education system that relied on polarized expatriate/alien ideology, human and material resources produced less competent, with radical ideas often with opting confrontational and competitive methods than co operational and peaceful ones. The prolonged civil wars that disrupted from 1960s right up until the demise of the socialist government are in one way or another results of the generations who are products of the education policies the two successive regimes.

Keywords

Quality education, student participation, relevance, equity Abbreviation

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May 27th, 4:00 PM May 27th, 5:05 PM

Education Systems that Forgot the Unforgettable Values: The Case of Ethiopian Education System from 1941 to 1991

Hall I

The guiding philosophy of an education system is derived from state ideology, which in most cases is based on indigenous legend and values. In this paper an attempt is made to show how a deliberate delink of education system from indigenous legend and values affect the success of education system. The education system of the two successive regimes of Ethiopia is taken as a case in point. To that end, the education systems and guiding principles of the two successive regimes that ruled over Ethiopia from 1941 to 1991is examined. Authors argue that each of the two regimes working in their own unique ideologies deliberately dissociated education system to use education as instrument to strengthen their dictatorial rule. It concludes that an education system that relied on polarized expatriate/alien ideology, human and material resources produced less competent, with radical ideas often with opting confrontational and competitive methods than co operational and peaceful ones. The prolonged civil wars that disrupted from 1960s right up until the demise of the socialist government are in one way or another results of the generations who are products of the education policies the two successive regimes.