Date of Award

6-2013

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. Amy E. Naugle

Second Advisor

Dr. Scott T. Gaynor

Third Advisor

Dr. C. Richard Spates

Fourth Advisor

Dr. Paul Metler

Abstract

The current study investigated the ability of a one-session computerized mindfulness intervention to mitigate posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-like symptoms in response to a trauma analogue. Ninety-two participants were randomly assigned to either mindfulness training or no treatment. Participants assigned to the mindfulness training completed a 1-hour computerized mindfulness training and practiced their skills for 1 week. All participants were exposed to an analogue for real-life trauma and were assessed at 1- and 2-week follow-up. Participants assigned to the mindfulness condition exhibited significantly lower levels of PTSD-like symptoms at 2-week follow-up in comparison to the no treatment condition. In addition, participants assigned to the mindfulness condition exhibited more acting with awareness and non-reactivity, and less experiential avoidance and state anxiety. However, contrary to initial hypotheses, participants assigned to the mindfulness condition did not exhibit lower levels of peritraumatic dissociation, and peritraumatic dissociation was the strongest predictor of PTSD symptoms at 1- and 2-week follow-up.

Access Setting

Dissertation-Campus Only

Restricted to Campus until

6-15-2023

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