Date of Award

12-1995

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Department

Educational Leadership, Research and Technology

First Advisor

Dr. David Cowden

Second Advisor

Dr. Catherine Sielke

Third Advisor

Dr. Robert Mills

Abstract

Procedures for recording information, capturing data for distribution to faculty, students, and other campuses was often being done manually by administrators at Baker College. Because of either a lack of access, or a lack of knowledge and training, simple computer data searches, spreadsheets, and telecommunications were difficult to accomplish and in some cases could not be done by Baker College administrators.

The sample population for this research consisted of forty-six males and forty-seven females for a total of ninety-three existing Baker College administrators, from nine campuses of varying size, throughout the State of Michigan. Data in the areas of computer aptitude, literacy, and interest of Baker College administrators were analyzed to determine if the administrators were above, below, or the same as the national means of the Computer Aptitude Literacy and Interest Profile (CALIP) (Poplin, Drew, and Gable, 1984). They were surveyed for computer experience by the Computer Experience Survey—part of the CALIP. Analysis for gender differences among the group was performed. The testing and survey provided information on the type of education and training needed by the administrators.

The overall findings of this study show that Baker College administrators had a higher than average ability to perform computer-related tasks, interest was average, and literacy was below average. Gender did not significantly affect the raw mean test scores.

The survey showed that some administrators had previous experience with computers, some had taken computer classes, and some had taught classes on how to use computers. However, the majority were not familiar with programming or software packages.

Eighty-eight percent had used a word processor with the highest percentage of use being at the beginner level. Fifty-seven percent had not worked in a team situation to develop programs or conduct computer related activities. Ninety-one percent had access to a personal computer at work. Fifty-nine percent of the administrators had a personal computer at home.

Access Setting

Dissertation-Open Access

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