Date of Award

12-1990

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Department

Educational Leadership, Research and Technology

First Advisor

Dr. James Sanders

Second Advisor

Dr. Brinkerhoff

Third Advisor

Dr. Brethower

Abstract

Demand and supply of certified special education substitute teachers in the Middle Cities Education Association in Michigan was examined to determine the difference between supply and demand and to describe the factors that attract these teachers to substitute teach in the public schools.

A four-item letter of inquiry was used to acquire information from the membership of the Middle Cities Education Association in regards to supply and demand. Twenty-eight usable returns were received for a 100% response rate.

Questionnaires were distributed to certified special education substitute teachers in 19 school districts. The questionnaire consisted of two parts. Seventeen items related to demographic data. The other 12 items related to attracting factors. Forty-four usable questionnaires were returned for a response rate of 61.9%.

Findings indicated that the demand for certified special education substitute teachers for 1989-90 exceeded the supply by 68%. The 28 school districts holding membership in the Middle Cities Education Association needed an additional 170 certified special education substitute teachers for the 1989-90 school year.

Factors that attracted certified special education substitute teachers to the public schools were salary, spouse's job in the area, opportunity for higher education, staff helpfulness, and school assignment close to home. The districts paying $50 or more employed 68\% of the certified special education substitutes in the Middle Cities Education Association. These substitute teachers also held the highest degrees, master's and master's plus.

Recruiter personableness was ranked important as an attractor for those recruited. Ninety-six percent of the certified special education substitute teachers were not recruited. Best resources for information about special education substitute teaching positions were identified as newspaper ads, educational fairs, radio, and brochures. The use of different communication factors such as the pleasantness of the recruiter, brochures, and newspaper ads appear not to have any influence on the certified special education substitute teachers' decision to substitute teach. The fact that a full-time teaching position was unavailable was the determining factor for the individuals to seek employment as a certified special education substitute teacher.

Access Setting

Dissertation-Open Access

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