Date of Award

12-1989

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Department

Educational Leadership, Research and Technology

First Advisor

Dr. Edgar A. Kelley

Second Advisor

Dr. David Cowden

Third Advisor

Dr. Robert M. Brashear

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not there was a positive and significant relationship between nurses' perceptions of self-esteem and job satisfaction. The review of related literature led to the development of a primary research hypothesis: There is a positive and significant relationship between self-esteem and job satisfaction of nurses. Two additional secondary hypotheses were developed to look at the relationship of self-esteem and job satisfaction with selected demographic characteristics.

The sample consisted of 48 full-time registered nurses employed as public health nurses by a health department. The health centers are located in a southeastern Michigan county. The instruments used in this study were the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and the Brayfield-Rothe Index of Job Satisfaction.

The primary research question (Is there a positive and significant relationship between self-esteem and job satisfaction for nurses?) was answered by the findings. There was a positive Pearson product-moment correlation (.164); however, this relationship was not statistically significant (p <.05 for the alpha level). Given the findings for the primary research hypothesis, the findings for the secondary research hypotheses were not reported.

Access Setting

Dissertation-Open Access

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