Date of Award

4-1989

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Department

Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. Robert Betz

Second Advisor

Dr. Chris Koronakos

Third Advisor

Dr. Winfred Futcher

Fourth Advisor

Dr. Edward L. Trembley

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine if a relationship exists between the music preferences, level of music involvement, and music uses among young people and the personality dimensions of internality (introversion), norm-acceptance, and sense of self-realization and psychological integration as measured by the Structural scales of the California Psychological Inventory.

An investigator-developed instrument was used to assess subjects' music preferences, level of music involvement, and uses of music. One hundred and sixty-three females and 137 males attending various southwestern Michigan colleges volunteered to complete both instruments. Subjects ranged in age from 18 to 20 years.

A one-way MANOVA indicated that both males and females who are less involved in music tend to be more norm-accepting and more introverted than those who are highly involved in music. A one-way MANOVA indicated that females preferring soft rock music tend to be more norm-accepting than those preferring either hard rock or nonrock music. For both males and females, canonical correlation analysis revealed no significant relationship between the personality variables and the music uses variables.

Canonical correlation analysis revealed a significant relationship between the personality variables and the music enjoyment (preference) variables for males, as well as a significant relationship between the personality variables and the combined music variables for both males and females. Multiple regression analysis revealed a significant relationship between the music uses variables and the music involvement variable for females, as well as a significant relationship between the music preference variables and the music involvement variable for both males and females.

Subjects rank-ordered seven music use categories. Results indicated that young people use music primarily as an adjunct to other activities and, secondly, as a way of improving or altering their mood state. Gender-related differences were also observed regarding major uses of music.

Based on the population sampled, it was concluded that there appears to be a relationship between listener personality and music preferences, level of music involvement, and major uses of music among young people; but the relationship is a complex phenomenon.

Access Setting

Dissertation-Open Access

Included in

Counseling Commons

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