Date of Award

8-1989

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Department

Educational Leadership, Research and Technology

First Advisor

Dr. Charles Warfield

Second Advisor

Dr. Edgar Kelley

Third Advisor

Dr. John Nangle

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a significant relationship between attendance at Supplemental Instruction (SI) and final course grades. This study focused on a program where only undergraduate students led SI sessions. The subjects were 268 students enrolled in three high-risk science courses at a public university in the Midwest during fall semester 1988.

Three research hypotheses were investigated: (1) There is a significant relationship between level of attendance at SI and final course grades. (2) Students who attend SI earn significantly higher final course grades than students who do not attend SI. (3) There is a significant difference in the grade distribution of students who attend SI and students who do not attend SI.

Each hypothesis was tested at the.05 level.

Attendance at Supplemental Instruction was significantly related to final course grades, and students who attended SI earned significantly higher final course grades than students who did not attend SI. There was also a significant difference in the grade distribution of students who attended SI and students who did not attend SI.

This was the first study to follow the stated standards for selecting S1 leaders. The findings from this study, where only undergraduate students led SI sessions, confirmed the major conclusion of earlier studies that there is a significant relationship between attendance at SI and final course grades. Since only a limited number of studies have been reported on SI, additional research is needed to identify those elements of the model that are related to student achievement.

Access Setting

Dissertation-Open Access

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