Date of Award

4-1987

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Department

Educational Leadership, Research and Technology

First Advisor

Dr. Edgar A. Kelley

Second Advisor

Dr. Ray Keech

Third Advisor

Dr. Larry Schlack

Abstract

Teacher absenteeism is a serious problem in school administration. The costs of teach absenteeism were estimated at two billion dollars per annum, according to a report published in 1981. Teacher absenteeism, like all forms of employee absenteeism, is a source of reduced productivity. Despite the seriousness and costs of teacher absenteeism, few studies of this problem have been completed.

In this study, reasons for teacher absenteeism in a K-12 school district were studied. Data from this study were compared to selective data from five medium sized school districts, with student population ranging from 3,350 to 22,845 students, located in Michigan.

Based on the data of this study, five major conclusions were made: (1) The demographic variables studied (age, sex, grade level of assignment) were not statistically significant, (p $>$.05). (2) School districts in Michigan were not using systematic procedures to monitor teacher absenteeism. (3) Reasons for teacher absence were similar in all school districts studied. (4) Systematic plans to reduce teacher absenteeism were not present or followed in the school district studied. (5) Special incentive programs to reduce teacher absenteeism were not offered by the school district studied.

A major recommendation of the study is that school districts should develop policies and systematic programs to monitor teacher absenteeism. School districts should make every effort to ensure that appropriate systematic programs are implemented that would have a positive effect on student achievement.

Access Setting

Dissertation-Open Access

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