Date of Award

12-1984

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Department

Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. Thelma Urbick

Second Advisor

Dr. Richard Pippen

Abstract

The relationship among locus of control, role conflict, role ambiguity and job satisfaction were examined for chief housing officers of member institutions of the Association of College and University Housing Officers-International with a resident population of under 1,000.

The literature review revealed that high levels of role conflict and ambiguity are related to low levels of job satisfaction and that locus of control affects perceived role conflict, role ambiguity and job satisfaction. Internals (those who believe their fate is controlled by themselves) experience less role conflict and ambiguity and more job satisfaction then do externals (those who believe their fate is controlled by factors external to themselves). However, empirical evidence of the relationships among locus of control, role variables and job satisfaction has been inconsistent.

The relationship among these variiables was further examined using Rotter's Locus of Control Scale, the Role Conflict and Ambiguity Scale and the Job Description Index. The investigator's Personal Data Questionnaire was used to gather personal and job-related information from the 104 of the 184 eligible participants who responded.

Seven hypotheses were formulated to examine the relationships among the variable. They examined (1) the influence of locus of control belief on perceived role conflict, role ambiguity, and job satisfaction (2) differences between the effects of locus of control belief and role variables on perceived job satisfaction and (3) the effects of locus of control belief and role variables on perceived job satisfaction.

No statistically significant differences were found between locus of control and perceived role conflict or role ambiguity. A significant difference was found between locus of control and perceived job satisfaction. Significant differences were found between job satisfaction and both role conflict and role ambiguity. Role ambiguity accounted for more of the explained variance in job satisfaction than did role conflict or locus of control.

Access Setting

Dissertation-Open Access

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