Date of Award

12-1986

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Department

Educational Leadership, Research and Technology

First Advisor

Dr. Charles Warfield

Second Advisor

Dr. David Cowden

Third Advisor

Dr. David Deshon

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to answer the following questions: (1) Do the supervisory styles used in the secondary schools of Kuwait satisfy teachers' lower and higher needs? (2) When using supervisory styles in the secondary schools in Kuwait, do supervisors consider teachers' growth and development? (3) What are the effective supervisory styles used at the secondary school level in Kuwait?

The research population consisted of 400 teachers randomly selected from three educational districts in Kuwait. Two questionnaires, Teachers' Perception of Supervisors Questionnaire (TPSQ) and Teachers' Need Satisfaction Questionnaire (TNSQ), were used to gather data. Of the questionnaires distributed, 93% were returned.

Using one-way analysis of variance, the relationship between teachers' job satisfaction and supervisory styles was investigated.

Using t test contrasts, the investigator found that high supportive-high administrative styles of supervision will provide greater motivation for teachers than low supportive-high administrative styles. Also, the investigator found that high supportive-high administrative styles of supervision will provide greater motivation for teachers than low supportive-low administrative styles. However, the investigator found that there was no significant relationship between high supportive-high administrative styles and high supportive-low administrative styles of supervision as perceived by teachers.

Moreover, using two-way analysis of variance, the investigator found a significant relationship between the job satisfaction of teachers and some of the demographic variables.

Based on these findings, several recommendations were made for further study.

Access Setting

Dissertation-Open Access

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