Date of Award

4-1986

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Department

Educational Leadership, Research and Technology

First Advisor

Dr. Uldis Smidchens

Second Advisor

Dr. Carol Sheffer

Third Advisor

Dr. James Stevenson

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to determine the extent to which mentoring affected the careers of community college administrators. The study was undertaken to determine if there was a difference between the perceptions of men and women regarding the importance of mentoring on career advancement and if there was a difference in the perceived impact that mentors made on the careers of male and female administrators. Additional comparisons were made between the assistance provided by male and female mentors. The influence of role models in early life on mentoring relationships during the careers of men and women administrators was also studied.

Data were collected from 15 women and 16 men (97%) administrators who held the top three administrative positions in public community colleges in Michigan. No difference was found in the perceptions of men and women regarding the importance of mentoring on career advancement, nor was a difference found in the mean rating of the perceived impact that mentoring had made on the careers of men and women. Men and women mentors were not found to provide a difference in assistance to proteges. It was found that women who had role models in early life had a greater incidence of mentoring in their careers than men who had role models in early life.

Mentors are believed to be an asset in the attainment of upper level administrative positions. While both genders value mentors equally, women tend to be the recipients of a greater number of mentoring experiences. The results of this study also include information regarding other factors to which administrators attributed their career success.

Access Setting

Dissertation-Open Access

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