Date of Award

12-2016

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. Heather M. McGee

Second Advisor

Dr. Alyce M. Dickinson

Third Advisor

Dr. Bradley E. Huitema

Fourth Advisor

Dr. Richard A. Van Enk

Abstract

When dealing with human observers and error, tight control in data collection methodology is essential for accurate representation of compliance. Although observational studies are popular, little has been done to examine the integrity of human observers within auditing processes, which this current study seeks to remedy. The purpose of this study is to revisit and expand upon past research regarding data collection integrity in order to assess whether manipulating response effort associated with an auditing task has an effect on data collection and report behavior. The present study demonstrates salient change in data collection behavior of student auditors when response effort of an auditing task was manipulated, emphasizing the need for awareness of integrity threats that may effect on data collection and report behavior. The present study demonstrates salient change in data collection behavior of student auditors when response effort of an auditing task was manipulated, emphasizing the need for awareness of integrity threats that may affect data collection. In addition, this study investigates differences in the auditing behavior of internal nurses and external students collecting hospital safety data. Internal nursing staff and external student data were examined explore ethical misconduct related to withholding and fabricating data, specifically "pencil whipping" behavior. Furthermore, this study reveals that comparisons of internal and external auditor data indicate falsification threats with data collection practices.

Access Setting

Dissertation-Campus Only

Restricted to Campus until

12-15-2026

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