Date of Award

4-1982

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Department

Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. Kenneth Bullmer

Second Advisor

Dr. Oswald

Third Advisor

Dr. Uldis Smidchens

Fourth Advisor

Dr. Robertson

Abstract

It was the purpose of this study to examine the relationship between women's perception of self as being competent to occupational role.

Based on a review of the literature and research it was hypothesized that a relationship between occupational role and competency self-perceptions did exist. Also, it was hypothesized that there is a relationship between occupational role and the difference between perception of self and view of ideal self in competency. Finally, it was hypothesized that there is a relationship between occupational role and the discrepancy between perception of self and perception of typical women in competency skills.

The sample of this study was a group of 133 women in Kalamazoo County, Michigan, between the ages of 24 and 45 who represented three occupational roles of homemaking, clerical, and professional. The subjects responded to a demographic questionnaire and the Broverman Sex-Role Stereotype Questionnaire. The competency cluster items on the Broverman Sex-Role Stereotype Questionnaire were used as the basis for evaluating the subjects' self-perceptions related to competency.

Results of the study were that there was no evidence to indicate that occupational role has an influence on self-perceptions of competency. There was also no evidence to indicate that occupational role influences the discrepancy between ideal and real self-competency perceptions. There was, however, evidence to support that occupational role does have an influence on the discrepancy between women's perception of self as being competent and women's perception of the typical female's competency skills. Professional women saw themselves as more competent than typical women to a greater extent than the other two groups of subjects.

Conclusions and recommendations for future research were made.

Access Setting

Dissertation-Open Access

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