Date of Award

12-1981

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Department

Educational Leadership, Research and Technology

First Advisor

Dr. Richard E. Munsterman

Second Advisor

Dr. Gene Booker

Third Advisor

Dr. Owen B. Middleton

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to develop a method for predicting success of students in a B.S. data processing program and data career success in data processing for those graduates.

Data were collected from Ferris State College records for high school rank, SCAT verbal and quantitative scores, all college GPA, data processing GPA, English GPA and sex. An instrument was developed to collect data from graduates' supervisors to measure career success. Multiple regression and correlation analysis, t-test for independent means and the chi square test for independence were employed. The sample population consisted of 271 students who enrolled in Ferris' B.S. program in data processing during the years 1972, 1973 and 1974. The 271 students consisted of 125 graduates and 146 dropouts.

The following conclusions were drawn as a result of this investigation: Research Hypothesis I stated that high school academic performance will be found to be a reliable predictor of academic performance in Ferris State College's B.S. data processing program. Data from this study supported this position. Research Hypothesis II stated that sex will be found to be a reliable predictor of academic performance in Ferris State College's B.S. data processing program. The data analysis did not support this position. Research Hypothesis III stated that sex will be found a reliable predictor of data processing career success. The data analysis did not support this position. Research Hypothesis IV stated that high school and college academic performance will be found to be a reliable predictor of dropout or persistence in Ferris' B.S. data processing program. The data analysis supported this position. Research Hypothesis V stated that high school and college academic performance will be found to be correlated with career success for graduates of Ferris' B.S. data processing program. The data did not support this position.

Therefore, it is possible to utilize high school and college academic performance data and aptitude tests for guidance and counseling information to help students make academic program decisions about data processing. However, it is not possible to use these data to predict success in a data career.

Access Setting

Dissertation-Open Access

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