Date of Award

6-2007

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. Linda LeBlanc

Second Advisor

Dr. James Carr

Third Advisor

Dr. Eric Fox

Fourth Advisor

Dr. David Palmer

Abstract

kinner described intraverbal behavior as verbal behavior with no point-to-point correspondence between the stimulus and the response. This verbal operant encompasses a wide range of response topographies ranging from answering simple questions to complex conversational exchanges. Previous interventions for teaching complex responding to questions about category membership have focused primarily on transfer of stimulus control procedures to teach specific intraverbal responses. These procedures have proven effective at establishing basic intraverbal responses but have consistently produced small and somewhat restricted repertoires. Theoreticians have hypothesized that effective use of problem-solving strategies rather than simple stimulus control may account for the performance of individuals with advanced intraverbal repertoires. The current study examined the use of a mediating strategy that involved rule statements and self-intraverbal prompts in the context of intraverbal categorization with four typically developing preschool children (ages 3-5). The results of this study showed that training alone did not produce significant increases in target intraverbal responses for any of the participants with any of the categories (animals, vehicles, and kitchen items). The results also showed that all participants were able to master the complex rule statements for self-prompting and apply these rules to the relevant training category. However, none of the participants applied the strategy until they observed a model and were prompted to "use the rules." Following the model and prompts, all participants showed immediate and significant increases in target intraverbal responding and all prompts were quickly decreased to zero. Graphic depictions of response patterns and overt self-prompting provide initial evidence for the utility of teaching a mediating strategy to enhance the complexity of intraverbal responding.e patterns and overt self-prompting provide initial evidence for the utility of teaching a mediating strategy to enhance the complexity of intraverbal responding.

Access Setting

Dissertation-Open Access

Included in

Psychology Commons

Share

COinS