Title of Presentation Proposal

Military Culture: Implications of More Multicultural Training

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

From a counseling psychology perspective, understanding the worldviews and culturally diverse perspectives of clients without passing negative judgments is an ethical responsibility (Sue, Arredondo, & McDavis, 1992). Some would argue that the military falls under this responsibility by presenting a specialized worldview that impacts those who serve within its ranks. Others, however, would argue that the military does not embody a specialized culture in the same way that gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation do. Therefore, there appears to be disagreement over whether the military could be considered a specialized culture in and of itself, and ultimately whether mental health providers should be required to attend to the cultural differences of the military in the same manner as the abovementioned cultural identities. The presenters have examined the reasons why military culture should be included under the larger multicultural umbrella and various ways in which counseling psychologists can provide better care by building awareness of the military culture’s impact on service members, veterans, and their families. The purpose of this presentation is to disseminate a valid argument pertaining to military culture training, as well as counseling implications, to colleagues in counseling and related fields.

Start Date

4-12-2013 4:00 PM

End Date

4-12-2013 4:50 PM

Location

Commons Area - 1st Floor

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Apr 12th, 4:00 PM Apr 12th, 4:50 PM

Military Culture: Implications of More Multicultural Training

Commons Area - 1st Floor

From a counseling psychology perspective, understanding the worldviews and culturally diverse perspectives of clients without passing negative judgments is an ethical responsibility (Sue, Arredondo, & McDavis, 1992). Some would argue that the military falls under this responsibility by presenting a specialized worldview that impacts those who serve within its ranks. Others, however, would argue that the military does not embody a specialized culture in the same way that gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation do. Therefore, there appears to be disagreement over whether the military could be considered a specialized culture in and of itself, and ultimately whether mental health providers should be required to attend to the cultural differences of the military in the same manner as the abovementioned cultural identities. The presenters have examined the reasons why military culture should be included under the larger multicultural umbrella and various ways in which counseling psychologists can provide better care by building awareness of the military culture’s impact on service members, veterans, and their families. The purpose of this presentation is to disseminate a valid argument pertaining to military culture training, as well as counseling implications, to colleagues in counseling and related fields.