Date of Defense

6-8-1995

Department

Marketing

First Advisor

Zahir Ahmed Quraeshi, Marketing

Second Advisor

Inayat Mangla, Finance and Commercial Law

Third Advisor

Mushtaq Luqmani, Marketing

Abstract

With strong economic growth, a potential market of 1.2 billion customers, and an unexploited terrain, China is being called the "Wild Wild East." Today, marketers of consumer goods are invading the country with slick Western products and marketing techniques. These marketers are in search of a market to set up shop and establish brand recognition before competition enters. Most perceive and instant success for their products, mostly stemming from ethnocentric views, and a 2st world mentality of superiority. "The consumer demand for our product is unlimited" they often say. However, experienced companies in the market portray a different story, one of sacrifice, long term investment, and governmental friction. For many reasons, marketing strategies need to be adapted for the special conditions in China. A more realistic view of market potential seems to be somewhere between 100 and 500 million consumers. The objective of this paper is to 1) examine historical influences (historical beliefs, philosophical ideas, and conflicting messages of Communist suppression and modernization), and recent influences (Western, Japanese, overseas Chinese, market location and orientation on Chinese costumer values), 2) to utilize these values and current factors within China including infrastructure and government regulations to suggest strategies for entering the Chinese market (4 P's of product, place, price, and promotion), 3) consider how a changing and developing environment with many inherent business risks (intellectual property protection, bribery and corruption, contract law, political instability, utility shortages, inflation, currency problems, payment delays, and preferential treatment) may influence the above strategies, 4) recognize influences that impact China today, and others that may influence China in the future (Post- Dent Xiaoping transition, Hong Kong 1997), and 5) conclude with a five year market entry map for marketers to use for guidance.

Comments

Fourth adviser: Timothy Light, Religion

Access Setting

Honors Thesis-Campus Only

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