Title of Paper

A Continuance Model for Knowledge-Based Clinical Decision Support Systems (KB-CDSS): Theories, Methods & Practices

Presenter Information

Joseph Tan, McMaster University

Session Type

Keynote

Topic

Healthcare Data Analytics and Decision-making

Location

Auditorium

Start Date

31-10-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

31-10-2015 11:20 AM

Abstract

Bio: As professor of eHealth at McMaster University, Dr. Joseph Tan has contributed to advancing research, teaching and services across multiple disciplines. An expert in cross-disciplinary studies, Tan’s academic appointments included professorships at the University of British Columbia, Wayne State University and Ceyts Universidad. Beyond this, Tan is actively engaged in multiple teaching, speaking and consulting assignments for both for- and non-profit organizations, especially on global e-health solutions and project management areas.

Abstract: Despite the need to a sustained use of healthcare information systems, research on the continuous use of knowledge-based clinical decision support (KB-CDSS) is lacking in the extant literature. This presentation will focus on key approaches to identifying knowledge gaps with KB-CDSS in the extant literature. It will explain how a novel theoretical model to understanding a phenomenon such as continuous use of a pain management CDSS can be developed. It will highlight the appropriateness and suitability of using mixed methods longitudinal v. cross-sectional study designs to uncover hidden knowledge, and to emphasize the need for knowledge translation research to bridge theory with practice. Importantly, guidance on how to go about conducting theory-based, methodappropriate applied research studies to explore factors influencing continuous use of automated clinical guidelines will be provided. The aim is to enhance a researcher’s understanding of the basic research process for interdisciplinary areas such as the need to provide guidance on developing a priori hypotheses relating to constructs and relationships underlying acceptance, use, and continuance use of, knowledge-based clinical decision support and on investigating the potential role of health information systems use in knowledge translation and practice.

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Oct 31st, 10:30 AM Oct 31st, 11:20 AM

A Continuance Model for Knowledge-Based Clinical Decision Support Systems (KB-CDSS): Theories, Methods & Practices

Auditorium

Bio: As professor of eHealth at McMaster University, Dr. Joseph Tan has contributed to advancing research, teaching and services across multiple disciplines. An expert in cross-disciplinary studies, Tan’s academic appointments included professorships at the University of British Columbia, Wayne State University and Ceyts Universidad. Beyond this, Tan is actively engaged in multiple teaching, speaking and consulting assignments for both for- and non-profit organizations, especially on global e-health solutions and project management areas.

Abstract: Despite the need to a sustained use of healthcare information systems, research on the continuous use of knowledge-based clinical decision support (KB-CDSS) is lacking in the extant literature. This presentation will focus on key approaches to identifying knowledge gaps with KB-CDSS in the extant literature. It will explain how a novel theoretical model to understanding a phenomenon such as continuous use of a pain management CDSS can be developed. It will highlight the appropriateness and suitability of using mixed methods longitudinal v. cross-sectional study designs to uncover hidden knowledge, and to emphasize the need for knowledge translation research to bridge theory with practice. Importantly, guidance on how to go about conducting theory-based, methodappropriate applied research studies to explore factors influencing continuous use of automated clinical guidelines will be provided. The aim is to enhance a researcher’s understanding of the basic research process for interdisciplinary areas such as the need to provide guidance on developing a priori hypotheses relating to constructs and relationships underlying acceptance, use, and continuance use of, knowledge-based clinical decision support and on investigating the potential role of health information systems use in knowledge translation and practice.