Title of Paper

Can Psychology Research Inform Health Information Data Collection?

Session Type

Seminar

Topic

Communication and Relationship-centered Healthcare

Location

Classroom 210

Start Date

30-10-2015 4:00 PM

End Date

30-10-2015 4:15 PM

Abstract

Electronic medical records (EMRs) offer opportunities to access and analyze unprecedented amounts of health data. Yet, the conclusions drawn from this health data are only as accurate as the data provided. Recent findings by psychologists and health researchers may help streamline health information data collection and subsequent data analysis. Specifically, three areas will be discussed: (1) Standardization of terms with an emphasis on standardization between the patient and the health professionals. (2) Concise measurement of health and the impact of patient inattention and fatigue when responding to health measures. (3) Source labeling within the medical record with an emphasis on how the health information was gathered (e.g., self-administered questionnaire, responded in-person to a health professional, provided via phone). Research suggests consideration of these potential biases could provide the patient with a better health care experience, assist the health care provider in diagnosis and treatment, conserve time and resources, and aid researchers as they consider health outcomes.

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Oct 30th, 4:00 PM Oct 30th, 4:15 PM

Can Psychology Research Inform Health Information Data Collection?

Classroom 210

Electronic medical records (EMRs) offer opportunities to access and analyze unprecedented amounts of health data. Yet, the conclusions drawn from this health data are only as accurate as the data provided. Recent findings by psychologists and health researchers may help streamline health information data collection and subsequent data analysis. Specifically, three areas will be discussed: (1) Standardization of terms with an emphasis on standardization between the patient and the health professionals. (2) Concise measurement of health and the impact of patient inattention and fatigue when responding to health measures. (3) Source labeling within the medical record with an emphasis on how the health information was gathered (e.g., self-administered questionnaire, responded in-person to a health professional, provided via phone). Research suggests consideration of these potential biases could provide the patient with a better health care experience, assist the health care provider in diagnosis and treatment, conserve time and resources, and aid researchers as they consider health outcomes.