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Abstract

The Indian Child Welfare Act seeks to protect Indian children from family and cultural disruption. The Act mandates minimum standards for the removal of Indian children and for their placement in foster care. However, a recent national survey suggests that requirements for Indian foster homes are not being met in public agency substitute care programs. At the same time, Native American child welfare agencies have developed a range of services for Native American children. The authors show that the intent of the Act will be better served if the case management of Native American children in public agency care is transferred to Native American child welfare agencies.

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