Date of Award

12-1988

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Anthropology

First Advisor

Dr. Elizabeth Garland

Second Advisor

Dr. Robert Jack-Smith

Third Advisor

Dr. William Garland

Access Setting

Masters Thesis-Open Access

Abstract

Archaeologists have an obligation to communicate the significance of data and research results to a fascinated but often uninformed public. How much the public understands about the field of archaeology is important to the profession. Through the media, people learn about the discovery of spectacular artifact treasures. This information often fosters the practice of treasure hunting, the looting and destruction of important archaeological sites. Via treasure hunting, along with land alteration and traffic in the sale of antiquities, the field of archaeology loses vast amounts of valuable information.

An interview questionnaire was given to 232 people with varying levels of education, and types of employment in an attempt to discover the depth and breadth of knowledge the general public has about the field of archaeology, and their willingness to support it financially or by other means. Finally, the need for educating the public is assessed and recommendations are made to the archaeological profession, particularly for more educational involvement with the public and with the federal government.

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