Date of Award

8-1986

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. Alan Poling

Second Advisor

Dr. Jack Michael

Third Advisor

Dr. David Lyon

Access Setting

Masters Thesis-Open Access

Abstract

Past research on adjunctive behavior in humans has generally not employed methods which are comparable to those included in studies of adjunctive behavior in nonhumans. Consequently, the results of these studies of adjunctive behavior in nonhumans. Consequently, the results of these studies are often difficult to interpret. The present study examined locomotor movement and salient self-stimulatory behaviors in two developmentally disabled students exposed to four fixed-interval (FI) schedules of food delivery (FI 16-, 60-, 120-, and 240-sec). Results of this study were analyzed according to whether the seven defining characteristics of the prototype of adjunctive behavior, polydipsia, were present. Locomotor movement and nut manipulation evidenced several of the defining characteristics. Characteristics of self-stimulatory behaviors of both subjects were similar to those of schedule-induced polydipsia under some schedules but different under other schedules.

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