Session Title

Letters and Law in the Long Twelfth Century: Correspondence and the Application of Church Law in Medieval Society

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Stephan Kuttner Institute of Medieval Canon Law

Organizer Name

Keith H. Kendall

Organizer Affiliation

Northern Michigan Univ.

Presider Name

Keith H. Kendall

Paper Title 1

Miracles and Canon Law in the Liber gratissimus of Peter Damian

Presenter 1 Name

Charles C. Yost

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame

Paper Title 2

Navigating Murky Waters: Gratian's Understanding of Reform Principles

Presenter 2 Name

Melodie H. Eichbauer

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Florida Gulf Coast Univ.

Paper Title 3

To Root Out Bad Customs in Sweden: Alexander III and Archbishop Stephen of Uppsala

Presenter 3 Name

Anders Winroth

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Yale Univ.

Paper Title 4

Purging Pluralist Judges in King's Courts: Dissemination and Enforcement of Pope John XXII's Execrabilis (1317) in England

Presenter 4 Name

Ryan Rowberry

Presenter 4 Affiliation

College of Law, Georgia State Univ.

Start Date

9-5-2013 3:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 2020

Description

Papers in this session offer insight into how letters and the law worked to effect reform over several centuries. That is, canon law in the long Twelfth Century witnessed mutually reinforcing trends: a rising interest in the study of law in the new schools and universities, and new efforts in the organization of the body of existing church law, such as Gratian's Decretum. In addition, one hallmark of the VERY long Twelfth Century - from the late 11th Century through the early 14th Century - was the constant effort by church leaders to reform not only the church but also Christian society. Medieval church leaders who, on the one hand, grasped the rising influence of canon law, and, on the other hand, faced the ongoing challenge of institutional and societal reform, also wrote letters. Some of their correspondence used canon law not only to disseminate the law but also to apply it in medieval society.

Keith H. Kendall

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May 9th, 3:30 PM

Letters and Law in the Long Twelfth Century: Correspondence and the Application of Church Law in Medieval Society

Fetzer 2020

Papers in this session offer insight into how letters and the law worked to effect reform over several centuries. That is, canon law in the long Twelfth Century witnessed mutually reinforcing trends: a rising interest in the study of law in the new schools and universities, and new efforts in the organization of the body of existing church law, such as Gratian's Decretum. In addition, one hallmark of the VERY long Twelfth Century - from the late 11th Century through the early 14th Century - was the constant effort by church leaders to reform not only the church but also Christian society. Medieval church leaders who, on the one hand, grasped the rising influence of canon law, and, on the other hand, faced the ongoing challenge of institutional and societal reform, also wrote letters. Some of their correspondence used canon law not only to disseminate the law but also to apply it in medieval society.

Keith H. Kendall