Session Title

Medieval and New Materialisms: Definitions and Methodologies

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Shannon Meyer

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of California-Santa Barbara

Presider Name

Shannon Meyer

Paper Title 1

Poetic Matters: Thomas Usk and Newgate Prison

Presenter 1 Name

Corey Sparks

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Indiana Univ.-Bloomington

Paper Title 2

The Wood for the Trees in the Works of Geoffrey Chaucer

Presenter 2 Name

Valerie B. Johnson

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Rochester

Paper Title 3

Imperial Hauntings: Ælla of Northumbria, Anglo-Saxon Historicism, and Fantasy Fiction

Presenter 3 Name

Donna Beth Ellard

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Rice Univ.

Start Date

9-5-2013 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1275

Description

Very recently, a number of volumes, ranging from interdisciplinary essay collections to special issues of medieval literary journals, have addressed an emerging field of "new materialisms." In Medieval Studies, recent work on materiality has primarily conceived of the material in terms of objects, their agential capacities and tendencies to elude mastery by willful human subjects in medieval narratives, and the philosophies of object ontology current in the Middle Ages. But, as the title of this session and a recent essay collection, "New Materialisms: Ontology, Agency, and Politics," suggest, these new materialisms are, in fact, highly varied in their definitions of the material and in the intellectual genealogies upon which they draw. The sometimes productive, sometimes highly incompatible, multiple definitions of materiality in use at the moment are being recognized in the fields of anthropology, sociology, and political science, but have yet to make their way into Medieval Studies. This session is being proposed in order to bring together scholars who are working on matters of the material as conceived in any number of ways: dialectical materialism, embodiment, cognitive studies, phenomenology, and vitalism, to name only a few. Through papers representing a range of perspectives, disciplines, and objects of study, this session hopes to test the limits and possibilities of these new discourses of materiality, in how they speak to each other as well as to the Middle Ages, that is, in how we might engage them in thinking about the Middle Ages.

Shannon Meyer

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 9th, 3:30 PM

Medieval and New Materialisms: Definitions and Methodologies

Schneider 1275

Very recently, a number of volumes, ranging from interdisciplinary essay collections to special issues of medieval literary journals, have addressed an emerging field of "new materialisms." In Medieval Studies, recent work on materiality has primarily conceived of the material in terms of objects, their agential capacities and tendencies to elude mastery by willful human subjects in medieval narratives, and the philosophies of object ontology current in the Middle Ages. But, as the title of this session and a recent essay collection, "New Materialisms: Ontology, Agency, and Politics," suggest, these new materialisms are, in fact, highly varied in their definitions of the material and in the intellectual genealogies upon which they draw. The sometimes productive, sometimes highly incompatible, multiple definitions of materiality in use at the moment are being recognized in the fields of anthropology, sociology, and political science, but have yet to make their way into Medieval Studies. This session is being proposed in order to bring together scholars who are working on matters of the material as conceived in any number of ways: dialectical materialism, embodiment, cognitive studies, phenomenology, and vitalism, to name only a few. Through papers representing a range of perspectives, disciplines, and objects of study, this session hopes to test the limits and possibilities of these new discourses of materiality, in how they speak to each other as well as to the Middle Ages, that is, in how we might engage them in thinking about the Middle Ages.

Shannon Meyer