Session Title

Exploring Medieval Pilgrimage Today

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Centre for the Study of Christianity and Culture, Univ. of York

Organizer Name

Dee Dyas

Organizer Affiliation

Centre for the Study of Christianity and Culture, Univ. of York

Presider Name

James Robinson

Presider Affiliation

National Museums Scotland

Paper Title 1

Public Devotion Made Private: Interacting with the Shrine Base of Saint William, York Minster

Presenter 1 Name

Sarah Blick

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Kenyon College

Paper Title 2

Exploring and Explaining the Power of Place and Sensory Experience

Presenter 2 Name

Dee Dyas

Paper Title 3

Pedagogy and Practice: Pilgrimage and Modern College Students

Presenter 3 Name

D. Thomas Hanks, Jr.

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Baylor Univ.

Start Date

9-5-2013 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1335

Description

Pilgrimage is a multi-disciplinary area of study which impinges on many aspects of Medieval Studies. Work on aspects of pilgrimage in the Middle Ages (and in Pilgrimage Studies in general) has expanded very considerably in the last decade or so with a growing range of disciplines (history, literature, theology, social anthropology, geography, sociology, psychology, art history, architecture, archaeology) making significant contributions to the field. In addition the practice of pilgrimage is experiencing a notable resurgence, with marked interest in the revival of medieval pilgrimage routes and shrines. This session will draw on current research from a range of disciplines and examine the pedagogical benefits of exploring the practice of pilgrimage with students today.

Dee Dyas

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May 9th, 3:30 PM

Exploring Medieval Pilgrimage Today

Schneider 1335

Pilgrimage is a multi-disciplinary area of study which impinges on many aspects of Medieval Studies. Work on aspects of pilgrimage in the Middle Ages (and in Pilgrimage Studies in general) has expanded very considerably in the last decade or so with a growing range of disciplines (history, literature, theology, social anthropology, geography, sociology, psychology, art history, architecture, archaeology) making significant contributions to the field. In addition the practice of pilgrimage is experiencing a notable resurgence, with marked interest in the revival of medieval pilgrimage routes and shrines. This session will draw on current research from a range of disciplines and examine the pedagogical benefits of exploring the practice of pilgrimage with students today.

Dee Dyas