Session Title

"Take Anothir Forme": The Selection of Forms in Thomas Hoccleve's Work

Sponsoring Organization(s)

International Hoccleve Society

Organizer Name

David Watt

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Manitoba

Presider Name

David Watt

Paper Title 1

Hoccleve and the Form of the Prologue

Presenter 1 Name

A. C. Spearing

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Virginia

Paper Title 2

Hoccleve's Poetics of Heresy and Sovereignty in the Regiment of Princes

Presenter 2 Name

Robin Wharton

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Georgia Institute of Technology

Paper Title 3

"The Substaunce of My Memorie": Memorial Forms in Thomas Hoccleve's "My Compleinte" and "La Male Regle"

Presenter 3 Name

Amy Anderson

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Kentucky

Paper Title 4

Hoccleve's Formulary: Parchment Poetics, Literary Allusions

Presenter 4 Name

Helen Maree Hickey

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Melbourne

Start Date

9-5-2013 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1345

Description

This session will explore how recent critical interest in form and formalism might contribute to our understanding of Hoccleve’s work as a maker of poetry and books. It will also explore how Hoccleve’s making of poetry and of books might contribute to our understanding of form in the early fifteenth century. Hoccleve’s own diction suggests that the selection of forms in the bureaucratic and moral realms can determine the difference between “harm and deceit” and “reward and truth.” To what extent do these consequences apply to the selection of literary and physical forms in Hoccleve’s work and, more broadly, to our conception of form in the early fifteenth century?

David A. Watt

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May 9th, 3:30 PM

"Take Anothir Forme": The Selection of Forms in Thomas Hoccleve's Work

Schneider 1345

This session will explore how recent critical interest in form and formalism might contribute to our understanding of Hoccleve’s work as a maker of poetry and books. It will also explore how Hoccleve’s making of poetry and of books might contribute to our understanding of form in the early fifteenth century. Hoccleve’s own diction suggests that the selection of forms in the bureaucratic and moral realms can determine the difference between “harm and deceit” and “reward and truth.” To what extent do these consequences apply to the selection of literary and physical forms in Hoccleve’s work and, more broadly, to our conception of form in the early fifteenth century?

David A. Watt