Session Title

Adventures in Archives (A Roundtable Discussion)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Antiphonaria: Inventories of Antiphoners in Flemish Collections, Alamire Foundation

Organizer Name

Kate Helsen

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Western Ontario

Presider Name

Kate Helsen

Paper Title 1

Discussant

Presenter 1 Name

James Borders

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Paper Title 2

Discussant

Presenter 2 Name

Judy Dietz

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Art Gallery of Nova Scotia

Paper Title 3

Discussant

Presenter 3 Name

Barbara Haggh-Huglo

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Maryland

Paper Title 4

Discussant

Presenter 4 Name

Maria Murphy

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Dalhousie Univ.

Start Date

9-5-2013 7:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1120

Description

Background: Antiphonaria is a project conducted through the Alamire Foundation (Leuven, Belgium) in which all handwritten antiphoners in Flemish archives produced during the Ancien Régime are catalogued and described. Of special interest is the local Flemish chant repertory found in these sources, and the unusually long time-span (i.e., Middle Ages to 1800) represented by the catalogue. This project brings the chant traditions of Flanders to the attention of international scholars and musicians in new ways. Along with the catalogues themselves, this project hosts exhibitions and concerts of the Flemish chant repertory, and provides the basis for articles and presentations within the community of chant scholars. The contents of some of the most interesting manuscripts will also be found in CANTUS and, in the long term, these catalogues will be available as part of the Alamire Foundation's online presence. The first volume of this eventually three-volume series is published by Brepols and edited by S. Long, I. Behrendt, with assistance of P. Mannearts, and contains Office manuscripts from Averbode, Dendermonde, Geel, Ghent, and Tongeren. The second volume, edited by I. Behrendt, K. Helsen and H. vanden Abeele, is currently in progress and will contain manuscripts from Park Abbey (Heverlee), Westmalle, Mechelen, and other archives.

Theme: A good manuscript catalogue series must aim to set and maintain good standards in its descriptions. Musical manuscripts add another layer of complexity for obvious reasons. In establishing the process for the first volume, and in progressing with work on the second volume, many interesting questions have come up concerning contents, use, historical context, and format of medieval musical manuscript catalogues in general, and about those being developed for Antiphonaria in particular. Of course, every scholar of the Middle Ages has had experience working with manuscript catalogues of varying quality with varying success. Some have been involved with the production of catalogues, whether print or online. All have ideas about how manuscript inventories and descriptions are best applied or improved. This round-table discussion will start a conversation between scholars with different specialities, at different stages in their careers, about these ideas.

Kate E. Helsen

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May 9th, 7:30 PM

Adventures in Archives (A Roundtable Discussion)

Schneider 1120

Background: Antiphonaria is a project conducted through the Alamire Foundation (Leuven, Belgium) in which all handwritten antiphoners in Flemish archives produced during the Ancien Régime are catalogued and described. Of special interest is the local Flemish chant repertory found in these sources, and the unusually long time-span (i.e., Middle Ages to 1800) represented by the catalogue. This project brings the chant traditions of Flanders to the attention of international scholars and musicians in new ways. Along with the catalogues themselves, this project hosts exhibitions and concerts of the Flemish chant repertory, and provides the basis for articles and presentations within the community of chant scholars. The contents of some of the most interesting manuscripts will also be found in CANTUS and, in the long term, these catalogues will be available as part of the Alamire Foundation's online presence. The first volume of this eventually three-volume series is published by Brepols and edited by S. Long, I. Behrendt, with assistance of P. Mannearts, and contains Office manuscripts from Averbode, Dendermonde, Geel, Ghent, and Tongeren. The second volume, edited by I. Behrendt, K. Helsen and H. vanden Abeele, is currently in progress and will contain manuscripts from Park Abbey (Heverlee), Westmalle, Mechelen, and other archives.

Theme: A good manuscript catalogue series must aim to set and maintain good standards in its descriptions. Musical manuscripts add another layer of complexity for obvious reasons. In establishing the process for the first volume, and in progressing with work on the second volume, many interesting questions have come up concerning contents, use, historical context, and format of medieval musical manuscript catalogues in general, and about those being developed for Antiphonaria in particular. Of course, every scholar of the Middle Ages has had experience working with manuscript catalogues of varying quality with varying success. Some have been involved with the production of catalogues, whether print or online. All have ideas about how manuscript inventories and descriptions are best applied or improved. This round-table discussion will start a conversation between scholars with different specialities, at different stages in their careers, about these ideas.

Kate E. Helsen