Session Title

The Built Environment as Material Culture in Medieval Europe

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Scott D. Stull

Organizer Affiliation

SUNY-Cortland

Presider Name

Scott D. Stull

Paper Title 1

Living with the Past: The Influence of the Roman Ruins on the Construction of Anglo-Saxon Towns

Presenter 1 Name

David D. Crane

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Boston College

Paper Title 2

The Tracks of Leo across Sea and Stone: Pilgrimage, the Built Environment, and Cultural Reproduction at the Early Medieval Monastery of Inishark, Co. Galway, Ireland

Presenter 2 Name

Ryan Lash

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Northwestern Univ.

Paper Title 3

The Archaeology of Romanesque Churches in Transylvania (Eleventh-Thirteenth Century)

Presenter 3 Name

Ioan Marian Tiplic, Maria Emilia Tiplic

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. “Lucien Blaga” din Sibiu, Institute of Socio-Human Research

Start Date

9-5-2013 7:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1140

Description

The built environment, encompassing buildings, gardens, town plans, and similar constructed forms, embodies social attitudes and cultural beliefs about a range of topics, and helps create and align patterns of behavior and the use of space. While the archaeology of buildings (houses, churches, forts, castles, etc.) has a long tradition, there has been very little attention paid to the way in which those buildings can help us understand social attitudes towards space. The session will explore the built environment of medieval Europe from the perspective that material creations convey, express, and contest social and cultural attitudes, beliefs, and ideals. The built environment can be used to explore much more than chronology or patterns of aesthetic expression, and can serve to reveal remarkable insights into relations of power, gender, and identity and related social topics in medieval Europe.

Scott D. Stull, Ph.D.

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May 9th, 7:30 PM

The Built Environment as Material Culture in Medieval Europe

Schneider 1140

The built environment, encompassing buildings, gardens, town plans, and similar constructed forms, embodies social attitudes and cultural beliefs about a range of topics, and helps create and align patterns of behavior and the use of space. While the archaeology of buildings (houses, churches, forts, castles, etc.) has a long tradition, there has been very little attention paid to the way in which those buildings can help us understand social attitudes towards space. The session will explore the built environment of medieval Europe from the perspective that material creations convey, express, and contest social and cultural attitudes, beliefs, and ideals. The built environment can be used to explore much more than chronology or patterns of aesthetic expression, and can serve to reveal remarkable insights into relations of power, gender, and identity and related social topics in medieval Europe.

Scott D. Stull, Ph.D.