Session Title

Wales and Middle English Literature

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Dept. of Celtic Languages and Literatures, Harvard Univ.

Organizer Name

Georgia Henley

Organizer Affiliation

Harvard Univ.

Presider Name

A. Joseph McMullen

Presider Affiliation

Harvard Univ.

Paper Title 1

Until North Wales: Reading Gawain's Journey into Wales

Presenter 1 Name

Joshua Byron Smith

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Arkansas-Fayetteville

Paper Title 2

British History and the History of England

Presenter 2 Name

Owain Wyn Jones

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Bangor Univ.

Paper Title 3

English Political Prophecy in Wales: The Untold Reception History of the Erceldoune Prophecies

Presenter 3 Name

Victoria Flood

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of York

Start Date

9-5-2013 7:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 204

Description

Given that so much extant early Middle English writing is of a provenance of the Welsh Marches and neighboring counties, it is not surprising that literary influences and exchanges across the borders of England and Wales have been found in such places as the language of the Katherine Group or the possible influence of Celtic poetic forms on the Harley Lyrics. Yet few studies have been devoted to the specifics of this cultural exchange; the influence of Welsh literature and Wales are most often mentioned in passing, and some claims of Welsh influence remain tenuous or disputed.

The purpose of this session is to explore some of these literary connections more fully. It is hoped that this session will foster discussion between the disciplines, explore the cultural links between the two bordering countries, and perhaps even lay to rest some disputed or tenuous claims of influence in the literature.

Georgia Henley

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May 9th, 7:30 PM

Wales and Middle English Literature

Bernhard 204

Given that so much extant early Middle English writing is of a provenance of the Welsh Marches and neighboring counties, it is not surprising that literary influences and exchanges across the borders of England and Wales have been found in such places as the language of the Katherine Group or the possible influence of Celtic poetic forms on the Harley Lyrics. Yet few studies have been devoted to the specifics of this cultural exchange; the influence of Welsh literature and Wales are most often mentioned in passing, and some claims of Welsh influence remain tenuous or disputed.

The purpose of this session is to explore some of these literary connections more fully. It is hoped that this session will foster discussion between the disciplines, explore the cultural links between the two bordering countries, and perhaps even lay to rest some disputed or tenuous claims of influence in the literature.

Georgia Henley