Session Title

What Was Global in the Middle Ages? (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Centre for the Study of the Middle Ages (CeSMA), Univ. of Birmingham

Organizer Name

Naomi Standen

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Birmingham

Presider Name

Naomi Standen

Paper Title 1

Panelist

Presenter 1 Name

Simon Yarrow

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Birmingham

Paper Title 2

Panelist

Presenter 2 Name

Mark Whittow

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Corpus Christi College, Univ. of Oxford

Paper Title 3

Panelist

Presenter 3 Name

Susan Noakes

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Paper Title 4

Panelist

Presenter 4 Name

Carla Nappi

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of British Columbia/National Humanities Center

Paper Title 5

Panelist

Presenter 5 Name

Rhiannon Stephens

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Columbia Univ.

Paper Title 6

Panelist

Presenter 6 Name

Thomas E. Burman

Presenter 6 Affiliation

Univ. of Tennessee-Knoxville

Start Date

9-5-2013 7:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 210

Description

Historians are concerned to find the origins of the human interactions that have created the present-day ‘global’ world, but global history is often inseparable from the need to explain the triumph of western Europe. Medievalists may be able to offer other ways of looking at global history. Several research projects are comparing ancient and medieval societies across the globe and identifying the connections between them, but quite what we mean by the pre-modern ‘global’ is still unclear.

This roundtable will provide an opportunity for medieval historians, those who study the period 600-1600, to think about how we should define the global in the Middle Ages. What are the problems of definition, evidence and approach? Can interpreting the evidence for connections and comparisons across the globe in this period extend the study of medieval history itself beyond the confines of western Europe between the fall of Rome and the Renaissance? How does the global relate to the local? Were these conflicts or peaceful interactions? And can we provide new questions for modern global historians?

Naomi Standen

Centre for the Study of the Middle Ages, University of Birmingham

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May 9th, 7:30 PM

What Was Global in the Middle Ages? (A Roundtable)

Bernhard 210

Historians are concerned to find the origins of the human interactions that have created the present-day ‘global’ world, but global history is often inseparable from the need to explain the triumph of western Europe. Medievalists may be able to offer other ways of looking at global history. Several research projects are comparing ancient and medieval societies across the globe and identifying the connections between them, but quite what we mean by the pre-modern ‘global’ is still unclear.

This roundtable will provide an opportunity for medieval historians, those who study the period 600-1600, to think about how we should define the global in the Middle Ages. What are the problems of definition, evidence and approach? Can interpreting the evidence for connections and comparisons across the globe in this period extend the study of medieval history itself beyond the confines of western Europe between the fall of Rome and the Renaissance? How does the global relate to the local? Were these conflicts or peaceful interactions? And can we provide new questions for modern global historians?

Naomi Standen

Centre for the Study of the Middle Ages, University of Birmingham