Session Title

Medieval Communities: Bound by Blood, Bound by Oath

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Comitatus (A Purdue Medieval Studies Student Organization)

Organizer Name

Erin Kissick

Organizer Affiliation

Purdue Univ.

Presider Name

Reme Bohlin

Presider Affiliation

Purdue Univ.

Paper Title 1

Building Community through Shared Narrative

Presenter 1 Name

Kate C. M. Koppy

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Purdue Univ.

Paper Title 2

Christ and His Þanes: Understanding Christ through His Role as Warrior Chieftain in Christian Skaldic Verse

Presenter 2 Name

Ruth Cheadle

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. College London

Paper Title 3

Breaking the Other: Restrained Violence as a Civilizing Force in Der jüngere Sigenot

Presenter 3 Name

John Paul Ewing

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Indiana Univ.-Bloomington

Start Date

10-5-2013 10:00 AM

Session Location

Valley II 201

Description

Arguably the most important literary definition of chivalry in medieval literature, Sir Thomas Malory’s Pentecostal Oath is King Arthur’s attempt to maintain order and integrity of his community of chivalrous but potentially dangerous knights. As this Oath and many others witnessed in medieval literature suggests, the idea, formation and dissolution of community in diverse social spheres is an important theme in medieval literature. The forms of medieval communities range from mead-halls of sagas to the courts of romances; they could also be small family units bound by blood, larger family units bound by marriage, or religious confraternities bound by common religious views. The types of communities range from secular to religious, aristocratic to lay; they differentiate themselves from each other by asserting their own initiation ceremonies, values, codes of conduct, and/or oaths. Such standards could hold the community together, yet a break of any could cause its destruction.

This session explores the diverse forms medieval communities take, how they define themselves as one and differentiate themselves from others, and the impact that such dynamics have in the literature and the larger society.

Erin C. Kissick

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May 10th, 10:00 AM

Medieval Communities: Bound by Blood, Bound by Oath

Valley II 201

Arguably the most important literary definition of chivalry in medieval literature, Sir Thomas Malory’s Pentecostal Oath is King Arthur’s attempt to maintain order and integrity of his community of chivalrous but potentially dangerous knights. As this Oath and many others witnessed in medieval literature suggests, the idea, formation and dissolution of community in diverse social spheres is an important theme in medieval literature. The forms of medieval communities range from mead-halls of sagas to the courts of romances; they could also be small family units bound by blood, larger family units bound by marriage, or religious confraternities bound by common religious views. The types of communities range from secular to religious, aristocratic to lay; they differentiate themselves from each other by asserting their own initiation ceremonies, values, codes of conduct, and/or oaths. Such standards could hold the community together, yet a break of any could cause its destruction.

This session explores the diverse forms medieval communities take, how they define themselves as one and differentiate themselves from others, and the impact that such dynamics have in the literature and the larger society.

Erin C. Kissick