Session Title

Are We Post-Queer? A Roundtable on the Present and Future of Queer Theory in Medieval Studies

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Society for the Study of Homosexuality in the Middle Ages (SSHMA)

Organizer Name

Graham N. Drake

Organizer Affiliation

SUNY-Geneseo

Presider Name

Michelle M. Sauer

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of North Dakota

Paper Title 1

Discussant

Presenter 1 Name

Jennifer N. Brown

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Marymount Manhattan College

Paper Title 2

Discussant

Presenter 2 Name

Zan Kocher

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Louisiana-Lafayette

Paper Title 3

Discussant

Presenter 3 Name

Tison Pugh

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Central Florida

Paper Title 4

Discussant

Presenter 4 Name

Felipe E. Rojas

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Paper Title 5

Discussant

Presenter 5 Name

Lisa Weston

Presenter 5 Affiliation

California State Univ.-Fresno

Start Date

10-5-2013 10:00 AM

Session Location

Valley II 205

Description

The application of queer theory to the disciplines, including medieval studies, has been facing destabilizing critiques. Some scholars argue that the inability to identify an identity in Queer Theory makes the discipline itself unstable and unsuitable. Some argue that Queer Theory is not political enough, and ignores its deconstructionist roots. Some argue that the term “Queer Thoery” is too limiting—and Teresa deLaurentis herself has argued that the term has been co-opted by the very institutions it strove against. Finally, a number of academics are currently questioning Queer Theory as being inadequate in its response to real-life issues of the LGBTQ community.

With these critiques in mind, this roundtable will address the overarching question: Are we post-Queer? Should we be? What does it mean to say one is a “gender theorist” instead of a “queer theorist”? How does the re-marginalization of queer theory particularly affect medieval studies, itself an increasingly marginalized field? This roundtable will bring together practitioners in several disciplines to consider these questions.

Michelle Sauer

University of North Dakota

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May 10th, 10:00 AM

Are We Post-Queer? A Roundtable on the Present and Future of Queer Theory in Medieval Studies

Valley II 205

The application of queer theory to the disciplines, including medieval studies, has been facing destabilizing critiques. Some scholars argue that the inability to identify an identity in Queer Theory makes the discipline itself unstable and unsuitable. Some argue that Queer Theory is not political enough, and ignores its deconstructionist roots. Some argue that the term “Queer Thoery” is too limiting—and Teresa deLaurentis herself has argued that the term has been co-opted by the very institutions it strove against. Finally, a number of academics are currently questioning Queer Theory as being inadequate in its response to real-life issues of the LGBTQ community.

With these critiques in mind, this roundtable will address the overarching question: Are we post-Queer? Should we be? What does it mean to say one is a “gender theorist” instead of a “queer theorist”? How does the re-marginalization of queer theory particularly affect medieval studies, itself an increasingly marginalized field? This roundtable will bring together practitioners in several disciplines to consider these questions.

Michelle Sauer

University of North Dakota