Session Title

Post Death / After Life on the Medieval and Early Modern Stage

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval and Renaissance Drama Society (MRDS)

Organizer Name

Frank M. Napolitano

Organizer Affiliation

Radford Univ.

Presider Name

Kisha G. Tracy

Presider Affiliation

Fitchburg State Univ.

Paper Title 1

"Loke þat зe be of ryght good chere": From Counsel to Christ in the N-Town Lazarus

Presenter 1 Name

Frank M. Napolitano

Paper Title 2

Night of the Living Bread: Resurrection Theology in the Chester "Antichrist" Play

Presenter 2 Name

Cameron Hunt McNabb

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Southeastern Univ.

Paper Title 3

Saints and Whores: Anatomizing Female Sexuality on the Early Modern Stage

Presenter 3 Name

Christine Gottlieb

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Los Angeles

Start Date

10-5-2013 10:00 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 1045

Description

This panel will focus on the concerns and preoccupations with dead, undead, or newly-risen bodies in medieval and Early Modern drama. The various depictions of Lazarus, Christ, and zombies in medieval drama, and the ghost of King Hamlet or the forms of Helen and Alexander on the Early Modern stage are but a few examples of the “dead” interacting with players and audiences. Moreover, examples abound of the dramatic importance of dead bodies’ presence on the stage. The miracles of the Virgin Mary’s body at her assumption or the spectacle of Julius Caesar’s corpse during Marc Antony’s speech show the devotional, rhetorical, or political potential of the inanimate body. How do these scenes reflect or refract the cultural conceptions of death and the afterlife in the plays’ original context or in the modern reproductions? What “authority” do the (un)dead hold over characters and audience?

Carolyn Coulson-Grigsby

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May 10th, 10:00 AM

Post Death / After Life on the Medieval and Early Modern Stage

Fetzer 1045

This panel will focus on the concerns and preoccupations with dead, undead, or newly-risen bodies in medieval and Early Modern drama. The various depictions of Lazarus, Christ, and zombies in medieval drama, and the ghost of King Hamlet or the forms of Helen and Alexander on the Early Modern stage are but a few examples of the “dead” interacting with players and audiences. Moreover, examples abound of the dramatic importance of dead bodies’ presence on the stage. The miracles of the Virgin Mary’s body at her assumption or the spectacle of Julius Caesar’s corpse during Marc Antony’s speech show the devotional, rhetorical, or political potential of the inanimate body. How do these scenes reflect or refract the cultural conceptions of death and the afterlife in the plays’ original context or in the modern reproductions? What “authority” do the (un)dead hold over characters and audience?

Carolyn Coulson-Grigsby