Session Title

Queer Hrotsvit

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Society for the Study of Homosexuality in the Middle Ages (SSHMA)

Organizer Name

Graham N. Drake, Colleen Butler

Organizer Affiliation

SUNY-Geneseo, Univ. of Toronto

Presider Name

Graham N. Drake

Paper Title 1

Reading Gender in Hrotsvit through Donatus

Presenter 1 Name

Colleen Butler

Paper Title 2

If You Can't Stand the Heat, Deny There's a Kitchen: When Straight Boys Can't Face Up To the Big Noise of Gandersheim

Presenter 2 Name

David Townsend

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Toronto

Paper Title 3

Unsettling Categories: Hrotsvit's Reframing of the Drusiana Legend

Presenter 3 Name

Helene Scheck

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. at Albany

Start Date

10-5-2013 1:30 PM

Session Location

Valley II 204

Description

Over the course of her lifetime, the tenth-century Saxon canoness Hrotsvit of Gandersheim produced three books of religious legends, plays, and epics based upon classical models and composed in Latin verse. As previous scholars have observed, Hrotsvit’s literary corpus demonstrates a pervasive concern with issues of gender and sexuality; most of her major characters are female, and her works contain depictions of sexual virginity, homosexuality, necrophilia, fetishism, rape, incest, and prostitution. The goal of this session to explore the ways in which Hrotsvit “queers” early medieval conceptions of gender and sexuality within an explicitly Christian framework. Possible topics include, but are not limited to: female homosociality, homosexuality, the sexual dimensions of mystical marriage, sexual desire, perversion, femininity/masculinity, the body, etc.

Colleen Butler

University of Toronto

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May 10th, 1:30 PM

Queer Hrotsvit

Valley II 204

Over the course of her lifetime, the tenth-century Saxon canoness Hrotsvit of Gandersheim produced three books of religious legends, plays, and epics based upon classical models and composed in Latin verse. As previous scholars have observed, Hrotsvit’s literary corpus demonstrates a pervasive concern with issues of gender and sexuality; most of her major characters are female, and her works contain depictions of sexual virginity, homosexuality, necrophilia, fetishism, rape, incest, and prostitution. The goal of this session to explore the ways in which Hrotsvit “queers” early medieval conceptions of gender and sexuality within an explicitly Christian framework. Possible topics include, but are not limited to: female homosociality, homosexuality, the sexual dimensions of mystical marriage, sexual desire, perversion, femininity/masculinity, the body, etc.

Colleen Butler

University of Toronto