Session Title

Ruptures in Italian Medieval Art and Architecture I: Ruptures in Historiography

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Italian Art Society

Organizer Name

Martina Bagnoli

Organizer Affiliation

Walters Art Museum

Presider Name

Linda Safran

Presider Affiliation

Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies

Paper Title 1

Ruptured Historiography: The Case of Italian Romanesque Sculpture

Presenter 1 Name

Dorothy F. Glass

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. at Buffalo

Paper Title 2

A Case of Mistaken Identity: An Historiographical Rupture

Presenter 2 Name

Janis Elliott

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Texas Tech Univ.

Paper Title 3

Brunelleschian Rupture or Historiographic Rapture?

Presenter 3 Name

Nick Camerlenghi

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Oregon

Start Date

10-5-2013 1:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 2030

Description

Whether moving forwards by leaps and bounds or coming to a screeching halt, the long path of Italian medieval art includes instances of backtracking, progression and return, revival and innovation. These four sessions seek papers that investigate art and architecture created at moments of rupture with tradition, with accepted norms or forms, with conventions or with anticipated developments. Ruptures include, but are not limited to, periods of iconoclasm, proto-renaissances, Church schisms, heresies and reforms, civil strife, Crusades, and the Black Death. To be sure, rupture is in the eye of the beholder: an egregious instance of it for some may constitute continuity for others. Accordingly, papers may address not only what was, but also what could have been, in an effort to trace the footsteps of winners and losers. These panels focus on people, events, ideas, and forms that in one way or another broke with the prevailing course of the arts in medieval Italy.

Martina Bagnoli

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May 10th, 1:30 PM

Ruptures in Italian Medieval Art and Architecture I: Ruptures in Historiography

Fetzer 2030

Whether moving forwards by leaps and bounds or coming to a screeching halt, the long path of Italian medieval art includes instances of backtracking, progression and return, revival and innovation. These four sessions seek papers that investigate art and architecture created at moments of rupture with tradition, with accepted norms or forms, with conventions or with anticipated developments. Ruptures include, but are not limited to, periods of iconoclasm, proto-renaissances, Church schisms, heresies and reforms, civil strife, Crusades, and the Black Death. To be sure, rupture is in the eye of the beholder: an egregious instance of it for some may constitute continuity for others. Accordingly, papers may address not only what was, but also what could have been, in an effort to trace the footsteps of winners and losers. These panels focus on people, events, ideas, and forms that in one way or another broke with the prevailing course of the arts in medieval Italy.

Martina Bagnoli