Session Title

Monasteries and Auctoritas in Medieval Europe I: Auctoritas and Heads of Religious Houses

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Journal of Medieval Monastic Studies

Organizer Name

Karen Stöber, Janet Burton, Martin Heale

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. de Lleida, Univ. of Wales Trinity St. David, Univ. of Liverpool

Presider Name

James G. Clark

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Bristol

Paper Title 1

Monastic Superiors and Auctoritas in Late Medieval Wales: The Case of the Cistercians

Presenter 1 Name

Janet Burton

Paper Title 2

Orthodoxy, Endowment, and Social Order: Justifications for Monasticism in Late Medieval England

Presenter 2 Name

Christopher Guyol

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Rochester

Paper Title 3

Challenging Abbatial Authority? Monastic Criticism of Abbatial Magnificence in Late Medieval England

Presenter 3 Name

Martin Heale

Start Date

10-5-2013 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 210

Description

Members of religious communities bound themselves from the very beginning, by taking the monastic vows of poverty, chastity and obedience, to the authority of their rule and superior. Monasteries also served as important centres of spiritual and secular authority in the wider world. This is the first of two sessions which will explore both these internal and external dimensions of monastic authority. This, the first session, will look specifically at the exercising and expression of authority of the monastic superior in religious houses, both male and female.

Karen Stöber

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May 10th, 1:30 PM

Monasteries and Auctoritas in Medieval Europe I: Auctoritas and Heads of Religious Houses

Bernhard 210

Members of religious communities bound themselves from the very beginning, by taking the monastic vows of poverty, chastity and obedience, to the authority of their rule and superior. Monasteries also served as important centres of spiritual and secular authority in the wider world. This is the first of two sessions which will explore both these internal and external dimensions of monastic authority. This, the first session, will look specifically at the exercising and expression of authority of the monastic superior in religious houses, both male and female.

Karen Stöber