Session Title

Spoken Word, Written Word: Ideas Crossing Contexts in Late Medieval Europe: In Memory of Gilbert Ouy (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Jean Gerson Society

Organizer Name

Nancy McLoughlin

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of California-Irvine

Presider Name

Christine Reno

Presider Affiliation

Vassar College

Paper Title 1

Discussant

Presenter 1 Name

Yelena Matusevich

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Alaska-Fairbanks

Paper Title 2

Discussant

Presenter 2 Name

Brian Patrick McGuire

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Roskilde Univ.

Paper Title 3

Discussant

Presenter 3 Name

Daniel Hobbins

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame

Start Date

10-5-2013 3:30 PM

Session Location

Valley II 205

Description

This roundtable is in memory of one of the most influential figures in Gerson studies, Gilbert Ouy. The discussion will recognize Professor Ouy's contribution to Gerson studies and medieval scholarship in general. It is also interested in the ways in which ideas like Gerson's crossed contexts. As Professor Ouy demonstrated that Gerson crafted his works to fit his specific audiences: the laity, university scholars, monks, pious women, members of the French royal court, and ecclesiastical councils. This session also seeks to better understand how the need to address different audiences in different mediums affected the ideas and rhetorical strategies of late medieval authors.

Nancy McLoughlin

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May 10th, 3:30 PM

Spoken Word, Written Word: Ideas Crossing Contexts in Late Medieval Europe: In Memory of Gilbert Ouy (A Roundtable)

Valley II 205

This roundtable is in memory of one of the most influential figures in Gerson studies, Gilbert Ouy. The discussion will recognize Professor Ouy's contribution to Gerson studies and medieval scholarship in general. It is also interested in the ways in which ideas like Gerson's crossed contexts. As Professor Ouy demonstrated that Gerson crafted his works to fit his specific audiences: the laity, university scholars, monks, pious women, members of the French royal court, and ecclesiastical councils. This session also seeks to better understand how the need to address different audiences in different mediums affected the ideas and rhetorical strategies of late medieval authors.

Nancy McLoughlin