Session Title

Anglo-French Cultural Exchange: Translation in Theory and Practice (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Jonathan Hsy

Organizer Affiliation

George Washington Univ.

Presider Name

Jonathan Hsy

Paper Title 1

Fuzzy Translation III

Presenter 1 Name

Ardis Butterfield

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Yale Univ.

Paper Title 2

French Letters to an English King: The Hospitallers in Outremer

Presenter 2 Name

Laura K. Morreale

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Fordham Univ.

Paper Title 3

More Than Words: Understanding Linguistic Exchange through Gower’s Cinkante Balades

Presenter 3 Name

Shyama Rajendran

Presenter 3 Affiliation

George Washington Univ.

Paper Title 4

Translatio Sancti, or, What’s Latin Got to Do with It?

Presenter 4 Name

Courtney E. Rydel

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Pennsylvania

Paper Title 5

Oure Englisshe Langage: Translating French with Lydgate and John Shirley

Presenter 5 Name

Elizaveta Strakhov

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Univ. of Pennsylvania

Paper Title 6

Familiar Enemies on Facing Pages: Translating Marie de France into English

Presenter 6 Name

Claire M. Waters

Presenter 6 Affiliation

Univ. of Virginia

Start Date

10-5-2013 3:30 PM

Session Location

Valley II LeFevre Lounge

Description

This roundtable seeks multiple vantage points for conceiving what we -- for lack of a better term -- call Anglo-French cultural exchange. Recent trends in medieval studies have attended to the movement of texts and ideas across both sides of the Channel/la Manche and throughout French-speaking areas on Continent. This roundtable aims to explore notions of exchange by attending to multiple locations and modes of Francophone cultural production, including lyric, artistic, architectural, devotional, musical, economic, epistolary, medical, and legal. We attend not just to the sources of influence and resultant products of “Anglo-French cultural exchange,” but to the vehicles, social processes, and conditions that make such exchange possible. Our definition of “Francophone” is deliberately expansive, encompassing any region or contact zone in the late-medieval period where some variety of French is used: whether such works are considered Anglo-Norman, part of the French of England, or medieval Francophonia. We welcome participants who explore the circulation of knowledge, materials, and ideas across, between, and among varieties of English and varieties of French. We actively seek participants from disciplines outside of literature (art, music, history, economics), and are open to scholars who are working on Francophone cultural productions that engage with languages other than English. We also welcome presentations that consider how the translation of medieval Francophone texts plays a role in contemporary scholarship and the present-day classroom.

Jonathan Hsy

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May 10th, 3:30 PM

Anglo-French Cultural Exchange: Translation in Theory and Practice (A Roundtable)

Valley II LeFevre Lounge

This roundtable seeks multiple vantage points for conceiving what we -- for lack of a better term -- call Anglo-French cultural exchange. Recent trends in medieval studies have attended to the movement of texts and ideas across both sides of the Channel/la Manche and throughout French-speaking areas on Continent. This roundtable aims to explore notions of exchange by attending to multiple locations and modes of Francophone cultural production, including lyric, artistic, architectural, devotional, musical, economic, epistolary, medical, and legal. We attend not just to the sources of influence and resultant products of “Anglo-French cultural exchange,” but to the vehicles, social processes, and conditions that make such exchange possible. Our definition of “Francophone” is deliberately expansive, encompassing any region or contact zone in the late-medieval period where some variety of French is used: whether such works are considered Anglo-Norman, part of the French of England, or medieval Francophonia. We welcome participants who explore the circulation of knowledge, materials, and ideas across, between, and among varieties of English and varieties of French. We actively seek participants from disciplines outside of literature (art, music, history, economics), and are open to scholars who are working on Francophone cultural productions that engage with languages other than English. We also welcome presentations that consider how the translation of medieval Francophone texts plays a role in contemporary scholarship and the present-day classroom.

Jonathan Hsy