Session Title

Ruptures in Italian Medieval Art and Architecture II: Ruptures in Architecture

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Italian Art Society

Organizer Name

Martina Bagnoli

Organizer Affiliation

Walters Art Museum

Presider Name

Catherine Carver McCurrach

Presider Affiliation

Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, Univ. of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Paper Title 1

The Anti-Architecture of Francis of Assisi

Presenter 1 Name

Gregory Caicco

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Art Institute of Pittsburgh/DePaul Univ./Univ. of Phoenix

Paper Title 2

Santa Maria Novella and the Birth of Gothic Structural Thinking in Florence

Presenter 2 Name

Elizabeth B. Smith

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Pennsylvania State Univ.

Paper Title 3

The Church of Santo Stefano in Verona and the Problem of Veronese Romanesque Architectural Style

Presenter 3 Name

Meredith Fluke

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Columbia Univ.

Paper Title 4

Stained Glass and the Long Path of Italian Medieval Art

Presenter 4 Name

Nancy M. Thompson

Presenter 4 Affiliation

St. Olaf College

Start Date

10-5-2013 3:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 2030

Description

Whether moving forwards by leaps and bounds or coming to a screeching halt, the long path of Italian medieval art includes instances of backtracking, progression and return, revival and innovation. These four sessions seek papers that investigate art and architecture created at moments of rupture with tradition, with accepted norms or forms, with conventions or with anticipated developments. Ruptures include, but are not limited to, periods of iconoclasm, proto-renaissances, Church schisms, heresies and reforms, civil strife, Crusades, and the Black Death. To be sure, rupture is in the eye of the beholder: an egregious instance of it for some may constitute continuity for others. Accordingly, papers may address not only what was, but also what could have been, in an effort to trace the footsteps of winners and losers. These panels focus on people, events, ideas, and forms that in one way or another broke with the prevailing course of the arts in medieval Italy.

Martina Bagnoli

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May 10th, 3:30 PM

Ruptures in Italian Medieval Art and Architecture II: Ruptures in Architecture

Fetzer 2030

Whether moving forwards by leaps and bounds or coming to a screeching halt, the long path of Italian medieval art includes instances of backtracking, progression and return, revival and innovation. These four sessions seek papers that investigate art and architecture created at moments of rupture with tradition, with accepted norms or forms, with conventions or with anticipated developments. Ruptures include, but are not limited to, periods of iconoclasm, proto-renaissances, Church schisms, heresies and reforms, civil strife, Crusades, and the Black Death. To be sure, rupture is in the eye of the beholder: an egregious instance of it for some may constitute continuity for others. Accordingly, papers may address not only what was, but also what could have been, in an effort to trace the footsteps of winners and losers. These panels focus on people, events, ideas, and forms that in one way or another broke with the prevailing course of the arts in medieval Italy.

Martina Bagnoli