Session Title

Queer Tolkien

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Society for the Study of Homosexuality in the Middle Ages (SSHMA); Tolkien at Kalamazoo

Organizer Name

Graham N. Drake

Organizer Affiliation

SUNY-Geneseo

Presider Name

Graham N. Drake

Paper Title 1

Niggle, Smith, and Giles: Medieval as Queer

Presenter 1 Name

Stephen Yandell

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Xavier Univ.

Paper Title 2

To All Elf-Friends and Wizard’s-Pupils: "It gets better": Medieval and Modern Categories of the Queer in Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings

Presenter 2 Name

Christopher T. Vaccaro

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Vermont

Paper Title 3

Respondent

Presenter 3 Name

Jane Chance

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Rice Univ.

Start Date

10-5-2013 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1220

Description

Congress sessions devoted to J.R.R. Tolkien have proven valuable for multiple medieval fields (history, literature, linguistics, medievalism, and pedagogy). A “Queer Tolkien” session (co-sponsored by Tolkien at Kalamazoo) would build on this impressive base and encourage new scholarship in two key ways. First, although scholarship on Tolkien has occasionally addressed topics such as gender non-conformity and homosocial bonding, the lens of Queer Theory differs from that of Gender Theory and other literary approaches, and a session devoted specifically to research through a queer lens has been largely overlooked. Second, while queer readings have sometimes overlapped with current research on Tolkien’s fiction, it has been almost entirely absent in approaches to his scholarly writings (on myth, linguistics, etc.), and this session invites papers covering all areas of the Tolkien corpus.

Stephen Yandell

Xavier University (Cincinnati)

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 10th, 3:30 PM

Queer Tolkien

Schneider 1220

Congress sessions devoted to J.R.R. Tolkien have proven valuable for multiple medieval fields (history, literature, linguistics, medievalism, and pedagogy). A “Queer Tolkien” session (co-sponsored by Tolkien at Kalamazoo) would build on this impressive base and encourage new scholarship in two key ways. First, although scholarship on Tolkien has occasionally addressed topics such as gender non-conformity and homosocial bonding, the lens of Queer Theory differs from that of Gender Theory and other literary approaches, and a session devoted specifically to research through a queer lens has been largely overlooked. Second, while queer readings have sometimes overlapped with current research on Tolkien’s fiction, it has been almost entirely absent in approaches to his scholarly writings (on myth, linguistics, etc.), and this session invites papers covering all areas of the Tolkien corpus.

Stephen Yandell

Xavier University (Cincinnati)