Session Title

Medieval Social Networking

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Society for Medieval Feminist Scholarship (SMFS)

Organizer Name

Wendy Marie Hoofnagle

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Northern Iowa

Presider Name

Wendy Marie Hoofnagle

Paper Title 1

Beguines and Their Social Networks in Medieval Paris

Presenter 1 Name

Tanya Stabler

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Purdue Univ.-Calumet

Paper Title 2

“Once Mistress of the World:” Rome and Early Medieval Women in the Letters of Boniface

Presenter 2 Name

Autumn Dolan

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Missouri-Columbia

Paper Title 3

Breaking the Rules? Reconsidering Richard Rolle's Misogyny in Relation to Communities of Female Readers

Presenter 3 Name

Louise Nelstrop

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Sarum College/Kellogg College, Univ. of Oxford

Start Date

10-5-2013 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1235

Description

Today, electronic social networking has become almost essential to our daily lives and work: from activities such as emailing, Facebooking (fbing) and tweeting to following people on Tumblr and connecting via Linkedin, social networking allows for individual participation in global communities of nearly infinite variety and purpose. This session seeks to explore medieval methods of “social networking” available to women, as well as attitudes toward networking and community. What kinds of social networks did women participate in during the Middle Ages? How were networks among women created and maintained? How did these compare with networks between women and men? Although feminist in context, this topic can be defined broadly and interdisciplinary approaches are especially welcome.

Wendy Marie Hoofnagle

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May 10th, 3:30 PM

Medieval Social Networking

Schneider 1235

Today, electronic social networking has become almost essential to our daily lives and work: from activities such as emailing, Facebooking (fbing) and tweeting to following people on Tumblr and connecting via Linkedin, social networking allows for individual participation in global communities of nearly infinite variety and purpose. This session seeks to explore medieval methods of “social networking” available to women, as well as attitudes toward networking and community. What kinds of social networks did women participate in during the Middle Ages? How were networks among women created and maintained? How did these compare with networks between women and men? Although feminist in context, this topic can be defined broadly and interdisciplinary approaches are especially welcome.

Wendy Marie Hoofnagle