Session Title

The Dawn of the Modern Era: Humanism, Early Renaissance, and Religious Reform in Northern Europe

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Fifteenth-Century Studies

Organizer Name

Mathilde van Dijk

Organizer Affiliation

Rijksuniv. Groningen

Presider Name

Kent Emery

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame

Paper Title 1

Nicholas Love as an Ecclesiastical Reformer

Presenter 1 Name

Michael G. Sargent

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Queens College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Paper Title 2

The Lively Religious Network of a Silent Carthusian Monastery: The Relationship between Jacobus van Gruitrode and the Regular Canonesses of Maaseik

Presenter 2 Name

José van Aelst

Presenter 2 Affiliation

IRHT Paris, ERC-project Oeuvres Pieuses Vernaculaires à Succès (OPVS)

Paper Title 3

Taking Things in Hand: Carthusian Manualists in the 1460s

Presenter 3 Name

Dennis D. Martin

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Loyola Univ. Chicago

Paper Title 4

Carthusians and New Devouts as Propagandists of Vernacular Reading

Presenter 4 Name

Mathilde van Dijk

Start Date

10-5-2013 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 204

Description

Sponsored by Fifteenth Century Studies, this session focuses on a specific theme, the contribution of the Carthusians to the history of reform in the Late Middle Ages. Among the few religious orders universally praised by the reformers, the Carthusians shared their ambition for pastoral care. In view of their secluded lifestyle, they did so by writing: copying, translating or authoring works for various audiences such as religious men and women and secular layfolk. This session explores the Carthusians’ connections to their audiences and other reformers and examines their ideas about the transmission of religious texts and pastoral care.

Mathilde van Dijk

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May 10th, 3:30 PM

The Dawn of the Modern Era: Humanism, Early Renaissance, and Religious Reform in Northern Europe

Bernhard 204

Sponsored by Fifteenth Century Studies, this session focuses on a specific theme, the contribution of the Carthusians to the history of reform in the Late Middle Ages. Among the few religious orders universally praised by the reformers, the Carthusians shared their ambition for pastoral care. In view of their secluded lifestyle, they did so by writing: copying, translating or authoring works for various audiences such as religious men and women and secular layfolk. This session explores the Carthusians’ connections to their audiences and other reformers and examines their ideas about the transmission of religious texts and pastoral care.

Mathilde van Dijk