Session Title

Beyond the Compilation: Technologies of Power and Administration in Post-Gratian Canon Law

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Iuris Canonici Medii Aevi Consociatio (ICMAC), the International Society of Medieval Canon Law

Organizer Name

Edward A. Reno III

Organizer Affiliation

Adelphi Univ.

Presider Name

Melodie H. Eichbauer

Presider Affiliation

Florida Gulf Coast Univ.

Paper Title 1

From Merus Minister to Iudex Delegatus: The Development of Thirteenth-Century Canonistic Doctrine on the Executors of Papal Provisions

Presenter 1 Name

Kerstin Hitzbleck

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. Bern

Paper Title 2

Decretists and "Enormity": The Formation of a New Category in Canonical Law, ca. 1150-ca. 1190

Presenter 2 Name

Julien Théry

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. de Montpellier III-Paul Valéry

Paper Title 3

Categories of Coercion: The Administrative Framework for Heresy and Adultery Legislation under Pope Gregory IX

Presenter 3 Name

Edward A. Reno III

Start Date

11-5-2013 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1275

Description

Recent research on the Church in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries has suggested a more dynamic evolution of papal authority, and its projection through decretal law, as pushed by centripetal demands from the “periphery,” as much as by outward pressure from the center. Yet the administrative mechanisms that produced this law have often been treated separately or taken for granted in the historiography. The proposed session will invite papers that seek to embed post-Gratian decretal law within the systems that gave rise to it – the bureaucracies of the Roman and episcopal curiae, the operations of judges delegate, and the law faculties charged with commenting on the law – examining how the technology of written administration and judicial oversight embodied, amplified and/or resisted the exercise of authority within the Church.

Edward A. Reno III

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May 11th, 10:00 AM

Beyond the Compilation: Technologies of Power and Administration in Post-Gratian Canon Law

Schneider 1275

Recent research on the Church in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries has suggested a more dynamic evolution of papal authority, and its projection through decretal law, as pushed by centripetal demands from the “periphery,” as much as by outward pressure from the center. Yet the administrative mechanisms that produced this law have often been treated separately or taken for granted in the historiography. The proposed session will invite papers that seek to embed post-Gratian decretal law within the systems that gave rise to it – the bureaucracies of the Roman and episcopal curiae, the operations of judges delegate, and the law faculties charged with commenting on the law – examining how the technology of written administration and judicial oversight embodied, amplified and/or resisted the exercise of authority within the Church.

Edward A. Reno III