Session Title

Rethinking Reform II: Liturgies of Reform

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Episcopus: Society for the Study of Bishops and Secular Clergy in the Middle Ages

Organizer Name

Maureen C. Miller, William L. North

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of California-Berkeley, Carleton College

Presider Name

Roger E. Reynolds

Presider Affiliation

Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies/St. Michael's College, Univ. of Toronto

Paper Title 1

Redressing the Bishop: Vestments and Color in Bruno of Segni’s On the Pentateuch

Presenter 1 Name

Louis I. Hamilton

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Drew Univ.

Paper Title 2

Sacramentary-Antiphoners as Sources of Chant and Liturgy in the Carolingian Era: Can We Speak of a “Liturgical Reform”?

Presenter 2 Name

Daniel J. DiCenso

Presenter 2 Affiliation

College of the Holy Cross

Start Date

11-5-2013 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1345

Description

This interdisciplinary panel hopes to incorporate liturgical practices and objects into the broader history of reform during the transformative period of the "long" eleventh century (the question of investiture, for example, is essentially a liturgical problem). Papers consider liturgical objects--vestments, the liturgical comb, and musical texts--within the broader context of the changing social conditions and the religious reform of Europe from the later Carolingian period to the early twelfth century.

John S. Ott

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May 11th, 10:00 AM

Rethinking Reform II: Liturgies of Reform

Schneider 1345

This interdisciplinary panel hopes to incorporate liturgical practices and objects into the broader history of reform during the transformative period of the "long" eleventh century (the question of investiture, for example, is essentially a liturgical problem). Papers consider liturgical objects--vestments, the liturgical comb, and musical texts--within the broader context of the changing social conditions and the religious reform of Europe from the later Carolingian period to the early twelfth century.

John S. Ott