Session Title

Learning from the Lyric: Interdisciplinary and Comparative Approaches to the Medieval Lyric

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Gale Sigal

Organizer Affiliation

Wake Forest Univ.

Presider Name

Gale Sigal

Paper Title 1

"The Wild Fox Blaze": David St. John’s Inheritance of the Courtly Lyric

Presenter 1 Name

Lisa Ampleman

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Cincinnati

Paper Title 2

“The Mouth of the Just" as Liturgical Resonance in the Poetry of the Old English Boethius

Presenter 2 Name

Karmen Lenz

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Macon State College

Paper Title 3

The Trombone in Medieval Lyric

Presenter 3 Name

Stewart Carter

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Wake Forest Univ.

Start Date

11-5-2013 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 2345

Description

The session engages a broad spectrum of innovative interdisciplinary ideas about medieval song. One aim of the session is to provide a forum for colloquy between tradition and interdisciplinary methods of understanding and teaching medieval lyric. The session offers a medieval courtly love perspective on the contemporary poetry of David St. John; an exploration of references to what will become the trombone in lyric; and a proposal that Boethius’ De Consolatione Philosophiae may well have been sung in the form of Christian hymns. Taken together, the session offers a wide variety of responses to newly discovered aspects of the medieval lyric.

Gale Sigal

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May 11th, 10:00 AM

Learning from the Lyric: Interdisciplinary and Comparative Approaches to the Medieval Lyric

Schneider 2345

The session engages a broad spectrum of innovative interdisciplinary ideas about medieval song. One aim of the session is to provide a forum for colloquy between tradition and interdisciplinary methods of understanding and teaching medieval lyric. The session offers a medieval courtly love perspective on the contemporary poetry of David St. John; an exploration of references to what will become the trombone in lyric; and a proposal that Boethius’ De Consolatione Philosophiae may well have been sung in the form of Christian hymns. Taken together, the session offers a wide variety of responses to newly discovered aspects of the medieval lyric.

Gale Sigal