Session Title

Art and Architecture of Medieval Alsace

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Gillian B. Elliott

Organizer Affiliation

Corcoran College of Art + Design

Presider Name

Gillian B. Elliott

Paper Title 1

Hagiography versus Archaeology: Monuments of the Veneration of Saint Attala in Saint-Étienne in Strasbourg

Presenter 1 Name

Christian Forster

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Geisteswissenschaftliche Zentrum Geschichte und Kultur Ostmitteleuropa, Univ. Leipzig

Paper Title 2

Cathédrale Notre-Dame-de-Strasbourg as an Architectural Expression of Transitional Biblical Exegesis

Presenter 2 Name

Richard A. Nicholas

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of St. Francis, Joliet

Start Date

9-5-2013 10:00 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 210

Description

The Art and Architecture of Medieval Alsace

Nestled between the Vosges mountains in the east and the Rhine river in the west, the region of Alsace entered its Golden Age during the High Middle Ages, when numerous castles and churches were built under the patronage of wealthy local nobles and successive German emperors. As part of the Holy Roman Empire, Alsace was patronized by the Salian kings and emperors (1002-1125); being the homeland of the Staufen dynasty (1138-1254), it enjoyed commissions of Emperor Frederick Barbarossa (1152-90); while from 1324 Upper Alsace was pawned to the Hapburgs. At the same time, it was the center of Dominican convents and female mysticism as well as a crossroad for pilgrims and merchants on the routes leading from Italy to the Netherlands, and from France to Germany. This session seeks to explore the nature of the cultural and artistic interaction in medieval Alsace, the ways imperial, ecclesiastic, civic, and monastic patronage communicated ideologies through visual rhetoric. The relatively good documentation that has survived (for example in Sélestat) allows a glance into the various modes of experience and responses available to contemporaries. Following the recent publications of Roland Recht (Believing and Seeing, 2008), Bruno Boerner (Bildwirkungen, 2008), and Christoph Brachmann (Um 1300, 2008), the session intends to explore the function of space and objects, and their agency in the Alsatian multi-cultural milieu. What defines this region artistically and how is the art and architecture of Medieval Alsace unique?

Gillian B. Elliott

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May 9th, 10:00 AM

Art and Architecture of Medieval Alsace

Bernhard 210

The Art and Architecture of Medieval Alsace

Nestled between the Vosges mountains in the east and the Rhine river in the west, the region of Alsace entered its Golden Age during the High Middle Ages, when numerous castles and churches were built under the patronage of wealthy local nobles and successive German emperors. As part of the Holy Roman Empire, Alsace was patronized by the Salian kings and emperors (1002-1125); being the homeland of the Staufen dynasty (1138-1254), it enjoyed commissions of Emperor Frederick Barbarossa (1152-90); while from 1324 Upper Alsace was pawned to the Hapburgs. At the same time, it was the center of Dominican convents and female mysticism as well as a crossroad for pilgrims and merchants on the routes leading from Italy to the Netherlands, and from France to Germany. This session seeks to explore the nature of the cultural and artistic interaction in medieval Alsace, the ways imperial, ecclesiastic, civic, and monastic patronage communicated ideologies through visual rhetoric. The relatively good documentation that has survived (for example in Sélestat) allows a glance into the various modes of experience and responses available to contemporaries. Following the recent publications of Roland Recht (Believing and Seeing, 2008), Bruno Boerner (Bildwirkungen, 2008), and Christoph Brachmann (Um 1300, 2008), the session intends to explore the function of space and objects, and their agency in the Alsatian multi-cultural milieu. What defines this region artistically and how is the art and architecture of Medieval Alsace unique?

Gillian B. Elliott