Session Title

Time and the Medieval Object

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Material Collective

Organizer Name

Gerry Guest, Maggie Williams

Organizer Affiliation

John Carroll Univ., William Patterson Univ.

Presider Name

Karen Overbey

Presider Affiliation

Tufts Univ.

Paper Title 1

Ductus and Duration: Physical and Sensory Engagement with Medieval Objects

Presenter 1 Name

Beth Williamson

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Bristol

Paper Title 2

Integrated Pasts: Glencairn Museum and Hammond Castle

Presenter 2 Name

Jennifer Borland, Martha Easton

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Oklahoma State Univ., Seton Hall Univ.

Paper Title 3

Dress You Up in My Angst: Clothing in Medieval Depictions of the Past and the Problem of Historical Distance

Presenter 3 Name

Brendan Sullivan

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Institute of Fine Arts, New York Univ.

Paper Title 4

The Still Lives of Medieval Objects

Presenter 4 Name

Benjamin C. Tilghman

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Lawrence Univ.

Paper Title 5

Respondent

Presenter 5 Name

Asa Simon Mittman

Presenter 5 Affiliation

California State Univ.-Chico

Start Date

11-5-2013 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 204

Description

This session considers the complex relationship between art objects and time in the Middle Ages and beyond. It proceeds from the notion that medieval things refuse to remain fixed in single temporal moments. Instead, they reach back into the past and also anticipate their future lives through a variety of strategies, both materialist and idealist.

Medieval objects are regularly marked by a temporal instability. Ancient and foreign spolia were integrated into fine golden church furnishings and reliquaries. Composite objects made connections across time through stylistic affiliations and iconographic citations, and they were regularly altered through the addition of new components and the removal of old. They were also subject to wear and tear through ongoing use and occasional repurposing. Gifting and other changes of setting created complex genealogies mapped out over time. Medieval objects continued to exist beyond the Middle Ages, and their impact on subsequent moments in time could also be a focus for proposed papers.

Nancy M. Thompson

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May 11th, 1:30 PM

Time and the Medieval Object

Bernhard 204

This session considers the complex relationship between art objects and time in the Middle Ages and beyond. It proceeds from the notion that medieval things refuse to remain fixed in single temporal moments. Instead, they reach back into the past and also anticipate their future lives through a variety of strategies, both materialist and idealist.

Medieval objects are regularly marked by a temporal instability. Ancient and foreign spolia were integrated into fine golden church furnishings and reliquaries. Composite objects made connections across time through stylistic affiliations and iconographic citations, and they were regularly altered through the addition of new components and the removal of old. They were also subject to wear and tear through ongoing use and occasional repurposing. Gifting and other changes of setting created complex genealogies mapped out over time. Medieval objects continued to exist beyond the Middle Ages, and their impact on subsequent moments in time could also be a focus for proposed papers.

Nancy M. Thompson