Session Title

In Praise of Folie: The Uses of Madness in Medieval French Literature

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Lucas Wood

Organizer Affiliation

Pennsylvania State Univ.

Presider Name

Kevin Brownlee

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Pennsylvania

Paper Title 1

Lancelot, Yvain, Merlin: Language Lost, Language Regained

Presenter 1 Name

Charlotte Ritzmann

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Pennsylvania

Paper Title 2

The Blame Game: The Use of Fos/Folie in Guillaume de Lorris's Roman de la rose

Presenter 2 Name

Ellen Lorraine Friedrich

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Valdosta State Univ.

Paper Title 3

The Madness of Intergeneric Desire, or, The Secret Passages of the Prise d'Orange

Presenter 3 Name

Lucas Wood

Start Date

11-5-2013 3:30 PM

Session Location

Valley I Shilling Lounge

Description

This panel examines the function of madness—or madnesses, for they are strikingly heterogeneous—as a narrative device, or, better, as a mechanism for creating and managing avenues of narrative and discursive possibility in Old French romance (Arthurian and allegorical) and epic. It is especially concerned with the connection between insanity as gender trouble and insanity as genre trouble. Guiding questions include: does the “liminal” state marked by madness permit, while also concealing and legitimating, textual forays into the ambiguous borderlands where generic conventions and possibilities mingle and interact with generative results? Does the madman’s or madwoman’s discursive and embodied performance enable passages, either permanent or temporary, between overdetermined systems of representation and ethical evaluation, that is, between various ways of reading and being read? How do characters, readers, and texts register and respond to such mad play?

Lucas G. Wood

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May 11th, 3:30 PM

In Praise of Folie: The Uses of Madness in Medieval French Literature

Valley I Shilling Lounge

This panel examines the function of madness—or madnesses, for they are strikingly heterogeneous—as a narrative device, or, better, as a mechanism for creating and managing avenues of narrative and discursive possibility in Old French romance (Arthurian and allegorical) and epic. It is especially concerned with the connection between insanity as gender trouble and insanity as genre trouble. Guiding questions include: does the “liminal” state marked by madness permit, while also concealing and legitimating, textual forays into the ambiguous borderlands where generic conventions and possibilities mingle and interact with generative results? Does the madman’s or madwoman’s discursive and embodied performance enable passages, either permanent or temporary, between overdetermined systems of representation and ethical evaluation, that is, between various ways of reading and being read? How do characters, readers, and texts register and respond to such mad play?

Lucas G. Wood