Session Title

Late Antiquity I: Secular and Religious Life in Late Antiquity

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Society for Late Antiquity

Organizer Name

Ralph W. Mathisen

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign

Presider Name

Ralph W. Mathisen

Paper Title 1

Fragile Evidence: Decorated Glass in Late Antique Rome

Presenter 1 Name

Stephanie Smith

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Youngstown State Univ.

Paper Title 2

A Second Seal Matrix of Alaric, Rex Gothorum

Presenter 2 Name

Genevra Kornbluth

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Kornbluth Photography

Paper Title 3

Why Rogationtide Is Not the Ambarvalia

Presenter 3 Name

Nathan J. Ristuccia

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame

Paper Title 4

Bishop Caesarius of Arles's Reluctant Healing Miracles: Monastic versus Martinian Spirituality

Presenter 4 Name

Giselle de Nie

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. Utrecht

Start Date

11-5-2013 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1255

Description

During the past 40 years Late Antiquity (ca. 200-800 CE) has become recognized as a new historical period with its own unique characteristics. With regard to religion, Late Antiquity is the first age of monotheistic religions represented by people seeking spiritual and emotional, not to mention material, satisfaction in religion. With regard to politics, Late Antiquity brought a retreat from centralized governments and a the tendency toward ever-larger empires that had been underway ever since the Bronze Age, and a movement toward localism even in the face of putatively strong central powers. Late Antiquity brought an expanded role of an underlying belief in the rule by law, seen in secular, canon, and vulgar law, at the same time that central authority seemed to be breaking down. Culturally, Late Antiquity is represented by artistic trends that focused on idealization, and the privileging of content/message over form. And with regard to literature, contrary to many past assumptions, Late Antiquity was marked by a great flowering of literary production, much of which survived because of the switch from the use of papyrus to parchment as the primary writing material. These sessions sponsored by the Society for Late Antiquity demonstrate how these, and other factors, give Late Antiquity its unique identity.

Ralph Mathisen

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May 11th, 3:30 PM

Late Antiquity I: Secular and Religious Life in Late Antiquity

Schneider 1255

During the past 40 years Late Antiquity (ca. 200-800 CE) has become recognized as a new historical period with its own unique characteristics. With regard to religion, Late Antiquity is the first age of monotheistic religions represented by people seeking spiritual and emotional, not to mention material, satisfaction in religion. With regard to politics, Late Antiquity brought a retreat from centralized governments and a the tendency toward ever-larger empires that had been underway ever since the Bronze Age, and a movement toward localism even in the face of putatively strong central powers. Late Antiquity brought an expanded role of an underlying belief in the rule by law, seen in secular, canon, and vulgar law, at the same time that central authority seemed to be breaking down. Culturally, Late Antiquity is represented by artistic trends that focused on idealization, and the privileging of content/message over form. And with regard to literature, contrary to many past assumptions, Late Antiquity was marked by a great flowering of literary production, much of which survived because of the switch from the use of papyrus to parchment as the primary writing material. These sessions sponsored by the Society for Late Antiquity demonstrate how these, and other factors, give Late Antiquity its unique identity.

Ralph Mathisen