Session Title

Christine de Pizan: Images and Iconography

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Christine de Pizan Society

Organizer Name

Benjamin M. Semple

Organizer Affiliation

Gonzaga Univ.

Presider Name

Julia Nephew

Presider Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 1

Hardement ou Fole Presumpcion: Navigating Femininity in Christine de Pizan’s Livre des fais d’armes et de chevalerie

Presenter 1 Name

Kaylin Myers

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Cornell Univ.

Paper Title 2

Literate and Learned "Je, Christine": The Iconography of Authorship and Authority in the Great Era of Cultural Capital

Presenter 2 Name

Burt Kimmelman

Presenter 2 Affiliation

New Jersey Institute of Technology

Paper Title 3

Christine's Stories: Libera and the Sabine Women as Images for Ethical Political Action

Presenter 3 Name

Allyson Carr

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Centre for Philosophy, Religion and Social Ethics

Paper Title 4

Christine de Pizan and Sapiential Tradition: Proverb, Illumination, and the "Law of Thy Mother" in the Proverbes Moraulx and Enseignemens Moraux of the Queen’s Manuscript (Harley MS 4431)

Presenter 4 Name

Ellen M. Thorington

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Ball State Univ.

Start Date

11-5-2013 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 212

Description

The session on Images and Iconography explores the connections between text and image. The session will investigate the role of the image in the construction of Christine de Pizan's authorial identity and the function of the image in granting her the authority, as a woman, to enter into the male-dominated arena of late medieval letters.

Benjamin M. Semple

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May 11th, 3:30 PM

Christine de Pizan: Images and Iconography

Bernhard 212

The session on Images and Iconography explores the connections between text and image. The session will investigate the role of the image in the construction of Christine de Pizan's authorial identity and the function of the image in granting her the authority, as a woman, to enter into the male-dominated arena of late medieval letters.

Benjamin M. Semple